Modelling?

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by stonster, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. stonster
    Joined: Jul 2010
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    Location: Cambridge, UK

    stonster New Member

    Hi all,

    Rather new to the idea of boat building. Main challenge is persuading family it's a good plan. Anyway, here is my beginner question - sorry if it's been answered already! A few people I've heard suggesting it's a good idea to build a scale model of a boat before you build the real thing. Does this still apply to stitch and glue boats, even if you've got the design from a book? And has anyone done it? Did it give you motivation, or just run you out of energy?

    Thanks!
     
  2. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    marshmat Senior Member

    Hi Stonser, welcome aboard the forum.

    Yep, a model is a great starting point. It's not always necessary, but is usually fun and rewarding.
    Why not? If you're buying plans, there are probably other boats of that class around, so you know it'll work. But there's nothing wrong with mocking it up yourself if you're so inclined.
    I built a 1:12 model of my Phil Bolger runabout before starting the full-size version. Despite being a simple taped-seam design, the model was worth the time (a day or so) it took to make, and it gave me a good idea of what to expect when bending the full-size panels into shape.
     
  3. KnottyBuoyz
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    KnottyBuoyz Provocateur & Raconteur

    I made one of simple bristol board (card) stock. As Matt said it's a good exercise. I wish I had the metric plans though, makes scaling easier! :p

    I've also modeled the boat in Google Sketchup for fun. That's cool, allows you to move things around, get a feeling for the accommodations before you even build the boat. There is a model of a DE25 (IIRC) on the bateau.com site somewhere.
     
  4. stonster
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    stonster New Member

    thanks for all your tips.

    Any thoughts on balsa v thin ply v card? I quite fancy thin ply because then at the end of the day you have a nice model to keep...
     
  5. KnottyBuoyz
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    KnottyBuoyz Provocateur & Raconteur

    Good choice.
     
  6. gww25
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    gww25 Junior Member

    Back in the old days it was almost a requirement that designers and even builders build a scale model of their proposed projects. I guess this has kind of gone out of style but I was taught to always build at least the rudimentary structure of the boat before going into full scale construction.
    I still think it's a good idea even today.
     

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  7. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    marshmat Senior Member

    I've tended to use card stock, simply because it's cheap and everywhere. But I'd rather use thin ply (for developable shapes) and foam or balsa (for compound shapes). Card stock doesn't stay fair for long once you start working with it.
     

  8. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    My earlier habit of building a model has been replaced by the use of hull design applications such as FreeShip, which will provide plank developments and other useful data. Of course you ned to start off with the hull lines.
     
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