Modeling with DELFTship

Discussion in 'Software' started by CSTRIB, Oct 8, 2018.

  1. CSTRIB
    Joined: Oct 2018
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Oregon

    CSTRIB New Member

    Hi everyone. I have been trying to make a few designs using FREEship and DELFTship over the last few months and have a design I like at this point. My question is in the "developability" of the plates. How much "error" is OK? it seems no matter how I try, every piece ends up with a small error and a bit of red showing up. Max edge error is -.00844 and max total area error is -.00198

    Also is it OK to "eyeball" dimensions on this? As far as the curves of the hull should I try and make everything a nice even number or just go for what looks good?

    Final question is how much should I try and cut out in continuous pieces? Is it OK to have to stitch the sides or top together or is it best to have long continuous pieces?

    Other than those questions is there anything alarming about the design that someone having built a boat before might see as a red flag? I am very open to input and don't be afraid to rip the design apart! boat plan.JPG plate developments.JPG
     
  2. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 5,349
    Likes: 136, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    It is clear that the areas marked in red there is a problem that you should analyze, quantify and, if important, solve before moving forward.
    Regardless of the error that the application tells you, you should also analyze to know what that error means, before proceeding to develop the various parts of the hull you should work a lot more smoothing the forms. The areas marked in the attached picture are not correct. The stem has to be improved a lot. The chines should be horizontal and the flat part of the keel is too wide, unless for some reason, which I can not think of, you need to make it so wide. It is not logical that in the mirror, which is flat, an area marked in red appears.
    All of the above indicates, in my opinion, that the forms are not good and that they will not lead to reliable developments.
    On the other hand, the maximum beam seems very big in relation to the length of the boat.
    Given the large opening of the boat cover, you should try to make the longitudinal elements as continuous and strong as possible.
     

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  3. CSTRIB
    Joined: Oct 2018
    Posts: 2
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Oregon

    CSTRIB New Member

    Thank you for the input. When you say "smoothing the forms" do you mean adding more edges? As far as the keel goes, I plan on this being a mini jet boat and the pump intake would be located there. Although the chines may be slightly too aggressive, I got the idea from

    and it seemed decent but if horizontal chines work better, I have no problem changing it. What would be the negative effects of downturned chines like this?
     

  4. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 5,349
    Likes: 136, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    Sorry, I meant "smoothing shapes", that is, softening the areas that have irregular points or areas.
    Horizontal keel: I had thought something similar but I think that its maximum breadth should also stay forward.
    Chines: I think so, horizontals are more effective. I do not see positive effects to highlight and, perhaps, slightly complicates the construction and the demolding (I'm not sure about this). It might be interesting to place a couple of spray rails on each side of the bottom.
     
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