Miniture Schooner

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Chikokishi, Mar 7, 2010.

  1. Chikokishi
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Montana

    Chikokishi Junior Member

    I built a sailboat last summer, it was only 8 feet long ( i attached a picture) And for my next boat i actually want to build a miniture boat like this one: http://www.libertyhospitalityofmaine.com/images/schooner.jpg But i want to run all the rigging and controls to one spot so that one person can control it. I want it to be roughly 15-20 feel long, and hold maybe 3-5 people. Does anyone think this is possible?
     

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  2. Perm Stress
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Perm Stress Senior Member

  3. Chikokishi
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Montana

    Chikokishi Junior Member

    Perhaps i should give a little insight to the use of what im planning. I actually live in Montana, as it turns out, oceans are in low supply around here. There are a few lakes around that i want to go sailing in though. Which is why i want a very small boat, but big enough to maybe take a friend or two in. Basically i want it to look like a big fancy schooner, but be about the size of a medium fishing boat.

    The reason i want it man able by one person in one spot is because i will probably be sailing by myself a lot.

    Im not a woodworker (I hardly have any tools at all) but i am pretty good at building things. And if i can find access to a shop with tools id have no problem at all i believe. The boat that i did build was built using a skill saw, a battery powered jigsaw that i found at a pawnshop (it quit working by time i finished the boat) a hammer, pliers, drill, hacksaw, and my workbench was 6 tires and the back of my 4runner.

    Next thing i need to do is learn how to sail! Haha, i have a novice idea, enough to move my little thing around, but not any real experience at all. Anyone know any good places online to learn?
     
  4. bistros

    bistros Previous Member

    You might want to look at Bolger's Folding Schooner search on Google and you'll find examples. His website is still up, and I think Harold Payson published plans as well. The very unique folding schooner can be towed by anything and it folds up smaller than most boats. Very midwest friendly and has great reviews.

    As far as learning goes, you are in scow country and there are lots of folks in your area sailing surprisingly high performance boats on your lakes. Finds a club near you by using google, show up and talk to folks. One visit and you'll have all the knowledge you need to find a school, get out on a boat and join in.

    --
    Bill
     
  5. Chikokishi
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Montana

    Chikokishi Junior Member

    You say there are lots around here? Wow, ill have to keep my eye out, iv only seen one sailboat in montana, and it was parked behind someones house.

    Im still browsing the internet for a good looking boat, All the good ones i find need 3-4 crew, and all the ones that are one man able have electric winches and such that i dont want. =(


    What if i took a boat that i liked and scaled it down, then i ran all the rigging along side the boat to the cockpit. Think this is possible?

    Really the schooner set up if more for looks than anythings, its not like im planning on sailing far, or fast, or with a large boat, or a large crew. I just like how they look and id like a miniature one. I might even end up designing my own at 10-15ft long.
     
  6. sharpii2
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Michigan, USA

    sharpii2 Senior Member

    A good way to learn how to sail is take your sailboat out to a small lake and just do it. That's how I learned.

    The board on your sailboat seems to be too far aft. It should be close to under the Center of Area (CA) of your sail plan or at least that of your mainsail.

    When you try sailing, make sure you have good oars or a good paddle to get back to shore if the sail rig proves unworkable ;)

    The big secret to sailing can be summed up in just one sentence:

    "Let the sail out until it starts flapping, then pull it in until the flapping stops."

    If your boat wants only steer downwind, the board is too far aft.
    If it wants to steer only upwind, the board is too far forward.

    It looks like the board (dagger board) on your boat is pretty easy to move fore and aft. I suggest you bring some tools with you to do this with.

    Probably, once you have the dagger board situated properly, you can learn the rudiments of sailing within a day or two.

    I suggest you spend a season sailing the boat you have just built to learn what sailing is about, then start planning your mini schooner.
     
  7. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    Looks like Camden's "Surprise", owned by a doctor, I think. If so, I've sailed aboard her years ago. Try one of Bloger's miniature schooners for a similar look.

    checked--- this is Surprise, very similar. http://camdenmainesailing.com/
     
  8. Chikokishi
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Montana

    Chikokishi Junior Member

    I think iv settled on using the plans for the very first boat that was posted in this thread. the one thats for sale. Bolgers Single handed schooner. One modification i have planned is i have a lawn mower steering wheel in my yard that im going to add to it for rudder control. My idea is just to run control lines from the rudder up the back of the boat, across the rear deck and down to the wheel, when it rotates one side is let out while the other side is wound up... Any other ideas?
     
  9. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    Complication isn't a good idea. The cockpit is not very far from the rudder. A tiller is simple and foolproof.
    A homemade wheel steering system using a lawnmower steering wheel is unnecessarily cluttery and much inferior to a tiller system. Maybe later when you've got more experience you might stray from the plans as drawn but having, as you say, little experience sailing or building, it's best to be conservative.
    Wheels are for heavy boats that respond slowly due to their greater mass. Light boats need to be corrected quickly, by shoving the helm one way or the other quickly. Otherwise, you might find yourself knocked down before you can head up into the wind, or crashing into a dock, or worse, another boat.
     
  10. Chikokishi
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Montana

    Chikokishi Junior Member

    The boat that i have right now has a Tiller, but because of where i sit i am always in the way of where it needs to go, i guess since this boat has a bit of a back that is fixed huh?
     
  11. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    Tiny boats require some gymnastics especially if others are aboard.
     

  12. Perm Stress
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: Lithuania

    Perm Stress Senior Member

    In small sailboat one has to sit with his back turned to windward side of his ship and ALWAYS keep his body forward of of the tiller.

    It is far superior to so sitting face forward for many reasons.
     

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