Military tunnel hull

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Intenseman, May 15, 2010.

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  1. Intenseman
    Joined: May 2010
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    Intenseman New Member

    Hello. I'm trying to locate a picture or a name or model for a 45' tunnel hull that was used by the military in the 40s. This is supposedly not a full tunnel. I apologize for the vagueness. This is for my father-in-law who's father bought one of these boats at a surplus sale back in the 50s.

    Thanks for your help in making an old man smile.

    Michael
     
  2. SaltOntheBrain
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    SaltOntheBrain Senior Member

    Are you talking about the Hickman Sea Sled? It's an inverted V, not really a tunnel.

    Search this forum and the net, there's a lot on them.

    Lance.
     
  3. Intenseman
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    Intenseman New Member

    I don't think so. I'm not sure. My father-in-law used the term "spoon nose". He also talked about being able to beach the craft because the prop was in the tunnel. One of the drawings I saw showed it below the boat. He also said that you would see them on the decks of the larger boats. They were used to bring the officers to shore. I don't know if his memory serves him correctly. These are the facts that he provided.

    Is there a military boat reference available on the web?

    Thanks,
    Michael
     
  4. WickedGood

    WickedGood Guest

    Penn Yan

    That would be the Penn Yan.

    Only tunnel hull that I know of the was made in the 1940

    [​IMG]
     
  5. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Well, that means not much........................


    .... as we can see!
     
  6. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

  7. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Sure you referred to wicked´s post, because PT boats had no "tunnel hulls".:D


    [​IMG]


    otherwise I would be fine with a excuse!
     
  8. SaltOntheBrain
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    SaltOntheBrain Senior Member

    Apex,
    Why don't you help answer the guy's question? Play nice, huh?

    Lance.
     
  9. Carteret
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    Carteret Senior Member

    Navy tunnel hull

    The US Navy did have a group of small craft called the LCPL (Landing Craft Personel). They were hung on ships and used for officers gigs and for transport of people to shore etc. Several models did have tunnels.
     

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  10. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Penn yan built tunnel hulls for the USN,maybe as sea rescue vessels.

    At least he tried....all you did was be obnoxious.
     
  11. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    West you are not fair. Richard was absolutly right.
    Daniel
     
  12. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Skira-have you helped?
     
  13. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    Good question.
    I fail in my duty :)
    Daniel
     
  14. WickedGood

    WickedGood Guest

    Tunnel Hull

    There were quite a few Tunnal Hulls back in 1944. The design proved itself valuable in the elimanation of the German agressors in Normandy.


    [​IMG]






    I have never driven on but my late Father in Law rode one onto the beach on D-Day. He did not take any photos, Just Snap Shots of a different type.

    They were made from Steel and ran on Blood & Guts. The US Navy Guys came in first and cleared the way for the US Marines who cleared the way for the Army who cleard the way for all of us today.
















    To the American Sailors & Soldiers.

    Thanks Guys!



    [​IMG]
     

  15. Village_Idiot
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    Village_Idiot Senior Member

    The Higgins landing craft was the boat of choice used at Normandy (D-Day). The way I heard it, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was there several weeks ahead of time clearing the way for the U.S. Navy.

    Higgins was a farm boy from Columbus, Nebraska. He grew up near the Platte River, which is known as being "a mile wide and an inch deep" which likely contributed to his efforts to design a boat that would draft shallow waters. Of course, shallow is relative - it did draft shallow compared to most armed personnel carriers, but still needed four feet draft at the transom. I understand it was a very rough ride.
     
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