Military recon powerboat concept

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Alex Alequin, Dec 19, 2006.

  1. kach22i
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 2,389
    Likes: 105, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1222
    Location: Michigan

    kach22i Architect

    I made three cut-out men out of foam about six inches tall. Somehow the scale change (making it larger) caught me by suprise.

    I have to follow the drawings more closely now, this takes a little of the fun (sculptural and design aspect) out of it. One of the main reasons I like to build models so much is that it forces me to make things simpler than I tend to draw them. I leveled out some of my floor area level changes for instance (less tripping).

    The main problem I discovered is that I deviated from the drawings for the roof openings. Roof mounted 50 cal gun turrets were first cut to only a 24" diameter (shoulder width). My previous drawings show 36" opening for single 50 cal and 48" dia. for a double 50 cal. These dimensions are based on the old Vietnam era PBR (bow gunner) patrol boat and SK5 hovercraft (roof gunners).

    If anyone knows if modern gun fittings and openings are different (such as found on the roof of a Humvee) please let me know. This information is hard to come by and I've been scaling plastic models and photographs which I have collected over the years.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. kach22i
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 2,389
    Likes: 105, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1222
    Location: Michigan

    kach22i Architect

  3. WALKERS210
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 1
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Alabama

    WALKERS210 New Member

    Ses 100b

    I know this is an older post, I found it doing a google search for info on the SES 100's. In 1972 I was assigned to the Navy's newest test facilty SESTF (Surface Effect Ship Test Facility) based at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md. I have read some of the post but the one following the one I quoted from questioned if the bow seal was damaged that the SES would pretty much crash and burn. I brought up the exact questions to engineers from Bell Aerospace and the Navy pilot. I was told that it would take major failure like loosing the entire bow seal to cause it to nosedive. However the very first SES built was about 25 ft in length and had plywood bow and stern seals that were hinged to hull. It was powered by a Mercury 150hp outboard, with 2 Briggs and Stratton (mower) engines that provided the air flow for lift. It ran on the Potomic river and in fact had a failure of the bow seal which resulted in both crew members being killed. I know its been darn near 35 years and the program has long since been scrapped. But it was a sight to see when the SES 100B went over the HUMP (18kts speed it would outrun its own depression in water) then it was gone. 1975 SES100B running in St Andrews bay in Panama City, Fl reached a speed of around 110kts. The Sidewalls were designed to hold in the air for lift and provide a way to stop or reduce the side slip while executing a turn. Somewhere in my old pile of junk I think I still have pictures of the SES 100B and even the SES100A.
     
  4. kach22i
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 2,389
    Likes: 105, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1222
    Location: Michigan

    kach22i Architect

    I did not know this story, how tragic.

    I may have pictures of that test craft in my Jane's Surface Skimmers 1975-76, it's description sure does sound familiar.
     
  5. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
    Posts: 4,755
    Likes: 145, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1903
    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Sea Knife, two recent new contributions

    _______________________________________________________
    How strange...within a period of a week here we got messages from two fellows involved with the SeaKnife project. The second message came to my private email, and I inquired as to whether the two were the same person...no was the answer. So I'll post his message here as he may not be interested in participating in the forum, but his comments are worth repeating


     

    Attached Files:

  6. peterAustralia
    Joined: Mar 2006
    Posts: 339
    Likes: 21, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 233
    Location: Melbourne Australia

    peterAustralia Senior Member

    I am a bit bemused as to why no one has mentioned the austal - grumman littoral combat ship, something scaled down from that might fit the bill. Maybe something in 60 to 70m range

    My understanding is that 3 hulls has better ability to carry weight that 2 hulls, with everything else being equal
     
  7. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
    Posts: 4,755
    Likes: 145, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1903
    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Littoral Combat Ship photos

    Here are some recent photos of the LCS 2 (to be USS) Independence . She’s at 43 knots here running at half power. NOTE the absence of a bow wave.

    Turns tightly, also; allegedly this also was done at 43 knots...and from the look of the small bow wave, she’s still in the turn.

    And then we have the massive helo deck big enough for a CH-53. Last time I talked with the SURFPAC guys years ago.THIS was the LCS they liked because of the huge storage capacity under that flight deck and the size of the flight deck.

    Note that there is very little spreading wake. In fact, it does not look like a wake at all, just foamy water from the water jets. Somehow, at 40 knots,you’d think there'd be more wake

    But she has one drawback, she’s strange looking but aerodynamically designed, is this beginning of a new design in ships?
     

    Attached Files:

  8. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
    Posts: 5,361
    Likes: 233, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 3380
    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    That is an impressive lack of wavetrain!
    I wonder why didn't they give her more flare up at the bow? I am thinking about it's seakeeping performance in high seas...
     
  9. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
    Posts: 4,755
    Likes: 145, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1903
    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    The modern thinking is to not try and ride over the wave but rather pierce thru it. For that reason the top deck surface area is actually reduced up higher such as not to present a big area to the water that would force the bow down while piercing thru it.
     
  10. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 2,264
    Likes: 160, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2040
    Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA

    jehardiman Senior Member

    You don't understand Navy thinking, i.e. littoral = no big waves. Only later will the need to cross seas or operate offshore continiously come into play. The design requirements only required max speed in SS 3, so if they used the maximum NATO envelope, that means 5 ft @ 8 sec.

    Here is a quote from the press release of the sea trials of LCS 2.

    And the ship specs: http://www.ussindependenceship.org/overview_ship.php

    8 ft waves = "high sea-state" :rolleyes:
     
  11. kach22i
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 2,389
    Likes: 105, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1222
    Location: Michigan

    kach22i Architect

  12. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,369
    Likes: 181, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  13. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 2,264
    Likes: 160, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2040
    Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA

    jehardiman Senior Member

  14. kach22i
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 2,389
    Likes: 105, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1222
    Location: Michigan

    kach22i Architect


  15. Anytec1210
    Joined: Aug 2010
    Posts: 44
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 69
    Location: Sweden

    Anytec1210 Junior Member

    Smyge

    Back in the days (late 80´s) when stealth was the really new and hot thing some really smart guys in Sweden put together the "Smyge" to prove the concept of a fast and capable attack and recon stealth vessel.

    In 1991 the ideas turned out in this.
    [​IMG]

    A 27 meters (about 90ft) and 140 tonnes. Equiped with SA and SS missiles, torpedos and a 40 mm gun reaching up to 60 knots.

    Since this was just a trial vessel they did not go into production but in 2000 those ideas turned into this.

    [​IMG]


    and today ..
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.