Method of assembly wood to steel

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by wailingdave, Mar 8, 2012.

  1. wailingdave
    Joined: Mar 2012
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    Location: Puako, Hawaii

    wailingdave Junior Member

    Aloha, we are renovating a steel hull converted motor sailor wheelhouse. The new one will be hardwood.. Question what is the preferred method of attaching the wood framed wheelhouse to the steel deck and any suggestions for what type of wood joinery to use at corners,doors and windows,, Please point me in the right direction.. Mahalo for the help and for having this website....WailingDave (blues power):cool:
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Corners on boats should be lapped. Miters open up when the wood dries. Through bolting a cleat would be my preferred method of attaching a whellhouse.
     
  3. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    wood and steel have very different expansion/moisture properties, therefore you need mechanical fastening with through bolts. Typically you would space through bolts about every six to eight inches thorough a wood sole plate through the metal deck or flange of the hull. Also where the wood meets the steel, you will need flexible gaskets for the same reason, or it will leak with any permanent hard adhesive/sealant.

    Than from the sole plate you build up the super structure out of wood, complete with fiberglass, paint, etc. Always keep in mind when working out the details that the connection at the wood/steel interface will always have a small amount of relative movement between the two materials. Use a thick flexible gasket, slightly over-sized or slotted holes, and other measures must be considered. When it is hot, steel gets larger and wood shrinks, when it is cold and wet, steel shrinks, and wood can expand as it absorbs moisture.

    Do that and it should hold up for a long time.
     
  4. wailingdave
    Joined: Mar 2012
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    Location: Puako, Hawaii

    wailingdave Junior Member

    A big thank you

    Aloha, thanks for the reply, good info, so could you please direct me to some examples of wood joinery typ. used on sailing vessels cabins and such, i'm looking for examples that are clean to look but strong,, many Mahalos from WailingDave:cool:
     
  5. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Hmm Joinery.

    Next to me in the shipyard is a beautiful motorsailor going thru refit. Wheelhouse was replaced. The new house is plywood, epoxy, glass with a 4mm veneer of teak vacume bagged to the outside. I didnt see the interior finish. Exterior looks spectacular.
     
  6. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Puako!

    What kind of hardwood is it?

    -Tom
     
  7. wailingdave
    Joined: Mar 2012
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    Location: Puako, Hawaii

    wailingdave Junior Member

    what kind of hard wood

    Mahao for responding,, the wood we have to use is old stock well dryed, Yellow heart and Angelique, and I have some local woods for decrative function parts (Milo,Koa,Keavie/mesqute, oh and I beleave some Wana ocotea rubra... Aloha,,,,, WailingDave:cool:
     

  8. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Nice.

    -Tom
     
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