Metalizing a boat hull

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Mercury, Jun 23, 2009.

  1. Mercury
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: California

    Mercury Mercury

    Hi, I am new to this forum and must say it is most enlightening to read all of the posts, thank you!

    The reason form my writing is that I live in S. California where there is a tremendous push to eliminate traditional anti-foulng paints such as Cuprous Oxides etc. I have heard many a report of alternate materials such as ceramic, Silicone and others but none seem to live up to the task. I am currently in communications with a company who are stating they can spray coat Stainless steel onto a Gel coated boat hull and offer protection for many years (10+), not from growth so much but that the bottom can withstand virtually any amount of aggressive diver cleanings with literally zero bottom damage! If anything they say " The Stainless will just shine more is all"

    I would like feedback on this as for me it means I can sail without polluting and fit in with all those trying to escape toxins in the water.

    Thanks,

    Mercury
     
  2. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    I guess that claim is not proven by so far. And if it has any antifouling properties it MUST be toxic, if we like it or not.
     
  3. Mercury
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: California

    Mercury Mercury

    Mercury

    I apologize if I did not make it clear in regards to anti-fouling. The manufacturer and applicator of the material makes no claim as to anti-foul properties of their coating, only that it is a skin of some 7mm of Stainless steel and as such is a surface unlike paint in that it can be cleaned very aggressively via divers with scrubbing equipment or even a zero tip pressure washer at 3,500 psi. The attachment of fouling will not be able to cause damage to the hull of the vessel. I have witnessed the pressure wash and it is everything they claim it to be. My posting was to obtain feedback as to the value of such a coating.

    Thanks,

    Terry
     
  4. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    If anything adds 7mm to the mass of a vessels surface it has a serious stability problem (the vessel) thats nonsense.
     
  5. Mercury
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: California

    Mercury Mercury

    I am not at all sure why anyone would object to a coating of 7 thousandths of an inch. Am I missing something. The average coating thickness for standard anti-foul paint can be much thicker and is often so so as to extend their seasonal life. Was it perhaps that I used the European measurement?

    Not meaning to post Nonesense,

    Terry
     
  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    No, you did mix something up! 7mm was what you said! thats 5/8 inch!
     
  7. Mercury
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: California

    Mercury Mercury

    Mercury

    Hope the measurement now makes more sense 177.8 micron for the Stainless steel coating is OK, yes? By the way it weighs approx. 48 grams per sq foot or 516 grams per sq meter.
     
  8. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    Location: Florida

    mydauphin Senior Member

    Who makes/sells this stuff?
     
  9. Mercury
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: California

    Mercury Mercury

    Boat bottom Stainless

    The company is located in Temecula California, they have not yet launched their product but will in one or two weeks I feel. I will be happy to pass on the info as soon as they have given me permission.


    Terry
     
  10. rugludallur
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Iceland

    rugludallur Rugludallur

    Sounds like a scam

    Most corrosion resistant metals get their corrosion resistance from an oxide surface layer they form that protects them from further corrosion. This is the case with stainless steel, aluminum, titanium and most other marine metals. All of the aforementioned metals require that the surface be kept clean, if the surface is fouled it will suffer from crevice corrosion and pitting due to oxygen starvation.

    Stainless steel comes in many flavors, 400 series can stain from fresh water while 2205/318 (duplex) will resist corrosion even while submerged in saltwater due to increased crevice/pitting resistance.

    Copper based alloys (usually copper/nickel) are to the best of my knowledge the only metals which can be used underwater without suffering from fouling, due to the "natural" anti-foiling properties of copper.

    The only method I can think of to coat a plastic boat with stainless (without suspending it in resin or paint) would be electroplating, the problem with electroplating is that without "baking" the object in a furnace after plating it will have micro fractures and cracks in the coating.

    The newer non toxic antifouling coatings are typically based on some sort of PTFE (teflon) or nano particle surfaces which are so smooth on a microscopic level that they resist the fouling, at this time they are only recommended for vessels that exceed 15 knots at least once every week.

    To sum up I'll put it this way, even if I had a boat made entirely of 2205 Duplex steel I would still coat everything below the waterline with antifouling.

    Regards
    Jarl
    http://dallur.com
     
  11. bifflefan
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: United States

    bifflefan New Member

    Apex1, your grasp of the math system is to say the least nonexistant. 15mm is close to 5/8". 7mm is close to 1/4". If your going to harrass someone at least have your stuff in order.
     
  12. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    I think i will struggle on a little longer with what I can get rather than spray the bottom of the boat with an unknown product that sounds pretty permanent.

    Actually the bottom of the boat is not a prob -its shafts rudders and props that are the high maintenance.
     
  13. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Use truck bed liner. It has good anti fouling properties and cleans easily.
     
  14. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Here we go!!!, antibiotics, toothpaste, antifreeze , felt tip pens, custard ,mustard, and one that does work is red lead mixed with vinegar.
     

  15. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Noticed! Even I mixed it up. But did not go to harras him.
     
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