Merka Ceros random orbital

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by michael pierzga, Nov 27, 2012.

  1. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    http://www.mirkadustfreesanding.co.uk/product.html

    Does anyone have any experience with the Merka Ceros ?

    Its eye watering expensive, but looks more compact and better suited than my normal Bosch sanders for an interior refinish project I have coming up.
     
  2. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    I looked at the link & didn't find the cost....... only the savings!
    Any time I have invested in tools to improve my process/quality etc the only time for regret is after buying a POS cheapie that didn't last, the more expensive here like Rupes/Festo I have still after many years & still paying their way & not worn out. All the best in your endeavours from Jeff.
     
  3. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    About 500 euros depending on configuration . Two times the cost of a good Bosch.
     
  4. susho
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    susho Composite builder

    I own one. It's small, quite powerfull, not very noisy, doesn't need a compressor and has better ergonomics than any electrical machine I've used. Great for finishing work. It's my main sander.
     
  5. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Cool...thanks
     
  6. mastcolin
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    mastcolin Senior Member

    Dunno who makes it for them but it doubt Mirka themselves. It looks good.

    Too be honest all the big names are good eg Rupes etc etc.

    Never seen an electric so small, I have always used Rupes and they are big and heavy (logical for 230v) but then you sorta gotta assume heavy enough motor not to get strained/burnt-out. The power ratings of these 22v volt motors are 400w as opposed to 550w with the rupes. Of course this doesn't always reflect in the work that the machine actually does i suppose. But it would appear that the mirka is lighter powered so one would assume less cutting power?

    Beware of what throw you buy. 8mm is for primers/filler. 5mm is rough for woodworking and clears. I'd recommend a 2.5-3mm throw here. Even 5mm can be noticeable in colours depending on products and quality levels. Speak to your paint supplier about this...but bear in mind he may say 2.5mm to be safe and you will be paying for the extra time needed to sand with this machine and it may be overkill.

    Why don't you go pneumatic if it is for big project? Air tools are cheaper, lighter, less servicing, safer. I know you need compressor but you say it is for big project so you will be cheaper in longrun I am sure.
     
  7. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Probably be the 2.5 mm orbit. Most of the work is fine paper.

    Air tools are great if you have the air. Unfortunately , This shipyard doesn't have centrally plumbed air. My baby air compressor doesn't have the volume for sanding.

    The sander is for interior refinish work.

    Hopefully its effective at dust evacuation.

    Its a shame that I cant actually test one out.

    Im still thinking..............
     

  8. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    Dust extraction is good, if you use a vacuum cleaner, that is...

    For finishing work (higer grit range,say 180 upwards) I recommend the 2,5mm (Mirka Ceros Sander 2,5mm)

    For general work the 5mm is ideal. (Mirka Ceros Sander 5mm)

    For course work the 8mm is usable (Mirka Ceros Sander 8mm) but to be honest if it is about really course work (shaping GRP) I would recommend a Festool with forced rotation, or even an angle grinder.

    In any case, these machines are very lightweight, yet sturdy, and if you have anything to do overhead, this is the only electric option.
     
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