Material Options...

Discussion in 'Materials' started by spiel_mit_feuer, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    if you want more help you need THANK others for there imput, simple
    When people help me here that is the first thing i do
    Ake RASMUSSAN, YES , , I SAW THIS BOAT HERE BUILT IN Germany, In have never ever seen the like of it so fair
    No stringers no paint, forget Dix there are plenty better
     
  2. spiel_mit_feuer
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    spiel_mit_feuer Junior Member

    what would you recommend for sailing through the north sea with? steel for the strength? or the grp sandwiched foam for insulation? and which designers would you recommend i search through?
     
  3. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    Steel has only one advantage, and that is, when its aground in surf on a coral reef
    but it is easy to build, to a point, forgiving in that even a poorly welded hull will stay in one piece
    To make a great job, fair, tidy elegent pretty is harder
    For one offs it is hard to beat
    Depends on your level of NATURAL skill, if you learn fast and have talent, with hands, read up and build in aluminium
    i will tell you one thing, a builder of timber yachts will tell you another, a builder of yachts made of sticky crap another and so on, in the end you will reach a decision,
     
  4. spiel_mit_feuer
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    spiel_mit_feuer Junior Member

    im pretty much going to over look aluminum for its cost, difficulty to weld, difficulty to repair, and going to look towards foam sandwiched grp, or steel for durability, price, and ease of repair, or the light weight and insulation of the fiberglass, im just not sure which one i want to go for.. or which one would be best for colder, northern waters
     
  5. spiel_mit_feuer
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    spiel_mit_feuer Junior Member

    to lazeyjack, your second yacht.. the alloy one.. what length is that? and if im not mistaken it looks radius-chined
     
  6. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    the grp sandwiched foam for insulation?

    With foam sandwich the ability to "over build" and bounce off burgey bits does not come with a huge weight penalty.

    The built in fire proof insulation is loads better than flamable foam sprayed on steel, that needs to be removed for repair or repainting.

    Airex , Mat and roving and good vynleester resin is a proven construction material.

    Home building in complex curved shapes , no problem.

    FF
     
  7. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Petros Senior Member

    You should also consider "Durakore" for fiberglass construction (do a web search for it). It is a balsa wood core/hardwood veneer skins building material that comes in several thicknesses in either sheets (for stitch and glue type construction) or bead-and-cove strips for strip planking applications. It produces one of the lightest and strongest fiberglass structures at lower cost than other methods. It appears easy to work too. much more durable than fiberglass over foam sandwich.

    Weather you build wood, fiberglass, steel or aluminum you should choose a material you like working with, you will live with it for a long time and if you do not like the construction method you will be hard pressed to ever finish it. Each of these building materials have advantages and disadvantages, and there are no large performance advantages to any of the construction methods if the design is optimized for the building material. There is some cost differences, though in terms of overall construction costs these too are a relative small percentage difference.

    You will likely learn the skills you need as you go, so the learning curve is really not as big an issue as which material you like to work with.

    You might also consider steel construction using a hard chine designed hull. It saves a lot of building time, and with a good design it does not affect performance that much (hardly noticeable in practical terms). The only drawback is that the underwater lines are not as attractive, but you will never see those lines them when you are using it. But you will appreciate every day that you got into the water that much faster than the extra weeks, months or even years it takes to make a pretty smooth rounded bilge hull would have taken. There are a lot of excellent hard chine designs available.

    I personally like wood, it is pleasant to work, relatively inexpensive, non-toxic and worked with simple hand held tools, it is also pleasant to look at in the finished product. Though it does have a lot more maintenance than other materials. And I think that an all wood hull is probably a poor choice for a boat that will stay in the water year around, better suited to a day sailor or trailerable boat that will stay sheltered out of the water when it is not being used.
     
  8. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    More or less second your opinions except this last one.
    Boat staying in water won't get (normally) abused like trailerable boats and have their protective coating relatively untouched over long periods..
    Wood is a poor choice for sloppy people..
     

  9. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    "Durakore" for fiberglass construction.It appears easy to work too.

    much more durable than fiberglass over foam sandwich.

    ONLY if there are no penetrations in the hull.

    Any penetration needs to be very carefully dug back and re created with epoxy goop.

    A tiny leak WILL SOFTEN THE BALSA , AND IT WILL ROT.

    A good foam core needs protection (usually epoxy too,) but mostly to keep the core from collapsing with a bolt or thru hull.

    FF
     
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