Master in Marine Survey - is it legal?

Discussion in 'Education' started by Alik, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    I just found these guys offering MSc in marine survey, without having a BSc. I mean is this legal in some countries? BSc takes about 200 credits, MSc another 100. So how it can work with 80+100 credits as they claim, also without study of general subjects such as maths, physics, engineering mechanics, etc.?
     
  2. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    In the UK, you can gain entry to MSc degrees (even BSc too) without a BSc or similar. BUT, only as a "mature student" and with at least some O'levels and A'levels and/or enough years of working in said field.

    It is a way not to penalise those whom have gone from school to work, without taking a degree yet progressed sufficiently far in their field of expertise (usually in-house or CET type course), without formal schooling. It recognises that such students whilst not holding a formal BSc degree are equally qualified to take an MSc. The curriculum does not change, it is the same for those who have a BSc or not.
     
  3. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    So full-time and real studies we did are equalized to those taking correspondence course without previous degree... Nonsense.
     
  4. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Your question was can a person take an MSc without having a BSc.

    The question of correspondence course, is a different question.

    Bottom line is, what is the curriculum...you need to compare that to any other, of equal academic level. And how are they judged to have passed??...is there a formal examination...is it just a thesis....and who marks it (their qualifications/field of expertise)...and who is the administrative authority issuing the degree (can they legally issue their own degrees or is it via another university)? All these questions refer to your later comment.
     
  5. BPL
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    BPL Senior Member

    Even with brick and mortar schools, some schools are known to be "party schools" and others are much more rigorous. Even if there is equivalent number of credit requirement, all are not the same.
     
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  6. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    As also noted here, my old Uni, where I did my Masters:

    http://www.southampton.ac.uk/postgr...mes/ses/msc_maritime_engineering_science.html

    "...Entry requirements: 2:2 honours degree (or equivalent) or above in engineering, mathematics or a science-based subject; applicants with relevant employment experience will be considered.."

    and:

    "..Applicants who do not meet the standard entry requirement will be asked to submit a CV detailing academic qualifications and industrial experience. This will be reviewed by the Programme Director on a case by case basis. Those not meeting standard entry levels may be advised on how the appropriate standard can be achieved. The candidate will be informed of the outcome in writing...", in more depth.

    And as shown here:
    http://www.southampton.ac.uk/engine...sc_marine_technology_small_craft_design.page?

    Also doing part-time, for flexibility:

    "..There are no fixed stages for the programme. The programme is designed for students working full time in industry and therefore needs to be as flexible as possible..."
     
  7. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    The question now is how to treat those 'graduates'. We just refuse dealing with those surveyors on technical issue because their qualifications is not enough for any kind of engineering survey.
     
  8. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    You need to look at their course and the curriculum, as I noted above, and also by BPL. Forget how many credits....what do they teach!

    If you sniff anything that smells fishy..it probably is...whereas if the course content is equivalent to any decent uni and the course and its advisors/lecturers are renowned....then that is a different matter.

    But you shouldn't penalise the applicant, just the course! It isn't their fault, they may not have had any choice.
     
  9. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    I have to enrol and check :)
    The problem is that sometimes we waste a lot of time trying to explain basics to laymen (and now might be those with MSc degree!); engineering survey assume certain level of discussion and knowledge of what is section modulus and residual resistance is essential.

    P.S. They also have online course of naval architecture; hope they will not start selling MSc in naval architecture same way soon :D
     
  10. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    Alik
    In the maritime industry, there has been for many years two opportunities for advancement.
    Up the hawse pipe (working your way up from deckhand or engineroom wiper),
    and in thru the cabin windows (graduating from a 4 year maritime college).

    Which do you think makes the better officer?
     
  11. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    We are not discussing the officers; we are discussing the surveyors who are working in engineering field. There is no way to become an engineer without proper degree first; maybe some genius did it as exception.
     
  12. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    The course also aims to recruit future surveyors into the industry. Not just from the dwindling number of seafaring professionals but also from non-seafarers that have the academic ability and interest in learning about the surveying of small craft.

    This quoted from the smallcraft surveyors course which is one of two prerequistes to the Msc surveyors course.
     
  13. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    Alik
    I'm not disparaging your degree, or college education. Colleges exist because that is an easier, more structured way to learn, and provides credentials.

    Self directed study is harder. But knowledge is knowledge. Do you agree?
     
  14. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    Yes, but there are two interesting issues:

    - those who have real Bachelor degree but no 'survey course' are not accepted for the Master course
    - those who have 'survey course' are accepted for Master even is they are not Bachelors.

    Needless to say, with proper academic degree one needs bachelor first (that gives engineering basics) and only after getting with certain honours one can apply for Master study.

    And in practice, those surveyors do not understand basics: that laminate or skin thickness depends on panel size, i.e. from distance between stiffeners. I could have shown their 'survey reports'...
     

  15. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    The prerequisite choice of survey course, is offered by the institution offering the Msc course. Exclusively to their graduates.

    Is this possibly because insufficient new students are signing up in the initial courses, and offering the Msc is hoping to entice former customers (students) to return? :)
     
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