Maserati-- 70' Ocean Racing Foiler

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Doug Lord, Feb 12, 2017.

  1. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    From Team Maserati:
    MASERATI MULTI 70 IS BACK IN THE WATER WITH THE NEW RUDDER SYSTEM

    July 2, 2018
    After three months in the boatyard in La Trinité-sur-Mer, the trimaran is finally back in the water. During these months, the Team worked to bring Maserati Multi 70 back to its flying asset, as well as to carry out all the necessary maintenance work after many miles of sailing.

    The big news is the new rudder system for the side hulls, developed by the designer Guillaume Verdier and Maserati Multi 70’s Team in order to deal with the problems caused by impact with floating objects.

    Because of the serious pollution in the sea, the risk of being significantly damaged by impact with debris is very high. The new system, though still a work in progress, represents a great improvement as it decreases the probability of serious damage in these cases.

    The rudder blades are attached to a pivot blocked by a hook. In case of shock or impact greater than 1200 kg, the hook is unblocked and the rudder blade is able to turn around the pivot and to move above the hull, to a horizontal position above the water.

    This is the first time that such a system has been designed specifically for T-shaped rudders. The development of this innovative system was possible thanks to designer Guillaume Verdier and to Maserati Multi 70’s technicians, who designed and produced parts of the mechanism directly in the boatyard.

    “We carried out a few tests on the flying asset and the rudders, we simulated an impact at the speed of 35 knots”, explains Giovanni Soldini. “We are very happy about the new system and we are now working on fine-tuning last adjustments with real loads”.

     
  2. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Maserati Flying:
    picture from Maserati facebook-

    Maserati flying 7-2018.jpg
     
  3. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

  4. Dolfiman
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Dolfiman Senior Member

    It is not an easy problem as it seems at first glance. Apparently they developed an home made solution, pure mechanism or electromechanism one ?
    I had to deal with the same problem for an other issue, and for simplicity and independence to any electrical bug, we adopted a pure mechanism solution that gave satisfaction.

    At first you have to identify 3 forces :
    - F1 : is supposed to correspond to the maximum force of normal use. Here it's an hydrodynamic force which can includes overspeed, slams, vortex induced vibrations, etc ... in brief not easy to determine . I imagine they had a long discussion on that point as of course you don't want the system to trigger too early for any extra hydrodynamic force that could occurred when sailing hard on waves.
    - F2 : for which the mechanism triggers
    - F3 : for which you have a first irreversible damage in the structure you want to protect. Here also, not easy to determine, by f.e.m. computation + cautious progressive tests on the existing structure with forces lower than F3 to be sure to stay in the elastic mode, and to estimate F3 by extrapolation.

    Of course, F1< F2<F3 but also :
    - up to F1, the whole system should stay in the elastic mode (no permanent deformation) and with very low elongation to not alter the overall rigidity of the system.
    - F2 - F1 sufficient enough, it is the safety margin / normal use. Idem for F3 - F2, the safety margin / first damage. That means that the dispersion dF of F2 should be as low as low as possible / adopted margins, and so based on a reliable statistics derived from in-lab tests.

    To comply with these specifications, we eventually adopted a necking steel sample (the link below) and did tensile tests in the shock mode ( i.e. very fast) with more than 10 samples machined the same way in the same piece of steel, to have a minimum 0f results to build a statistics on, for the usual 95% of confidence or more if necessary : Résultats Google de recherche d'images correspondant à https://www.mtu.edu/materials/k12/experiments/tensile/tensile-test-steel.gif https://goo.gl/images/Sq2kbR

    But it is not finished....., you should also think to the other mode of breaking, the one due to the fatigue. The mechanism undergoes a large number of stress cycles during its normal use, and after millions of them ( e.g. the Wohler curves) the breaking limit is seriously altered. So to stay on the safe side, you should change the piece very regularly, and put another one of the same series of fabrication, fortunately this is not very costly.
     
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  5. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    I don't yet fully understand how Maserati's t-foil rudder could kick up without ripping the rudder out of the boat? I'm familiar with the Laser(Glide Free) rudder t-foil system that changes the angle of the rudder foil with respect to the rudder as it kicks up but I haven't seen any evidence to suggest that is what Maserati is doing. Any thoughts?

    Laser kickup t-foil rudder glide free.gif
     
  6. waynemarlow
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    waynemarlow Senior Member

    Certainly the experience I have of smashing a couple of lower pintles off my rudder, with T foils, at speed ( one a lobster pot rope and the other simply not strong enough pintle mount ), its not as catastrophic as one would expect. Both times the rudder simply bent the top pintle and simply waffled about until the pin bent far enough for the T foil to broach the surface, where it simply acted as a small braking effect on the boats speed. Both time I sailed the boat back to shore as I didn't have the tools to demount the top pintle ( I had it bolted through ).

    My guess on these big beasties that it would hardly be noticeable to the helmsman other than sound and a lack of normal response.
     
  7. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    I don't know-I've read stories of rudder t-foils added to kick-up rudders that literally pulled the transom off... Dr. Sam experimented with it and his was a catastrophic failure when the rudder kicked up while the boat was on foils.
     
  8. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

  9. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Maserati on foils!

    Maserati flying!.jpg

    Maserati Flying 3.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2018
  10. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Maserati flying-facebook pix:

    Maserati flying-maserati facebook.jpg
     
  11. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

  12. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Maserati rudders: At 8:22 am yesterday- We are dismantling the rudders that will be modified in the coming days. We are developing the latest tuning of the system: after the tests we have made this summer we decided to make a change to the rudder profile and this should greatly improve the flight control of # MaseratiMulti70 .
    They seem to be having trouble with the rudder system-again. I wonder if it's just a coincidence that Gitana 17 had rudder issues as well? Or maybe Guillaume Verdier discovered something in testing both boats that makes a big improvement? dl

    Video: Giovanni Soldini Pagina Ufficiale https://www.facebook.com/giovannisoldini/videos/vb.23888074942/332891624131589/?type=2&theater

    If you don't do facebook you can still see the video if you click on the big arrow and then quickly click on the two small diagonal arrows on the lower right side.......
    ====================
    See post 102 in the Gitana 17 thread for a bit on their rudder trouble:
    Gitana 17-100' Trimaran Foiler-Launch 7/17/17 https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/gitana-17-100-trimaran-foiler-launch-7-17-17.58231/page-7
     
  13. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

  14. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Maserati in Middle Sea Race:
    Maserati Multi 70 arrived today in Valletta, in Malta, ready to participate in the 39th edition of the Rolex Middle Sea Race. At the historical Maltese regatta there will be 149 sailing boats crossing the starting line on Saturday 20th October at 11.00 am (9.00 am UTC).

    For this edition of the regatta, Maserati Multi 70’s skipper Giovanni Soldini will be joined by a crew of 7 people:

    • Guido Broggi (ITA) – mainsail trimmer
    • François Robert (FRA) – pitman
    • Carlos Hernandez (ESP) – trimmer
    • Matteo Soldini (ITA) – grinder and trimmer
    • Oliver Herrera Perez (ESP) – bowman
    • Nico Malingri (ITA) – grinder and trimmer
    • Vittorio Bissaro (ITA) – tactician
    In the MOCRA category, alongside Maserati Multi 70, there will be 5 more teams: the Italian Ad Maiora, the Swiss Allegra, the Polish R-SIXand, Maserati Multi 70’s direct rival, the English MOD 70 PowerPlay (former Concise 10), skippered by Ned Collier Wakefield.

    The Rolex Middle Sea Race, organized by the Royal Malta Yacht Club, is celebrating this year its 50th anniversary since its first edition in 1968. The regatta’s 606 miles route is sailed anti-clockwise around Sicily, passing North of Stromboli, West of Favignana and Pantelleria and South of Lampedusa, before heading back to the finish line in Valletta.

    The speed record is held by George David who, in 2007, crossed the finish line aboard Rambler in 47 hours, 55 minutes and 3 seconds.
     

  15. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Maserati on Foils!----- starting Saturday we're going to be able to see a great race-particularly the contest between Maserati on foils and her sistership "Power Play" a conventional Mod 70.
    Malta is 6 hours ahead of us so the start at 11am their time will be
    5am Eastern.
    ---Rolex Middle Sea Race http://rolexmiddlesearace.com/

    ---Course map: Course Map http://rolexmiddlesearace.com/race/course-map
    ---No tracker listed so far.......will probably be : YB Tracking | Truly global satellite tracking beacons for yacht racing, adventures, treks, expeditions and challenges | Home https://www.ybtracking.com/
    ---Maybe able to watch the start live here: TVM live TV. https://wwitv.com/tv_channels/b4268.htm

    Go Maserati!!!


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2018
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