Marinising a Kubota V1505

Discussion in 'Inboards' started by Marco1, Oct 23, 2009.

  1. Marco1
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Sydney

    Marco1 Senior Member

    Hi there!

    I bought a new Kubota engine V1505 for a bargain price and would like to marinise it.
    I have two suppliers of a kit for this particular engine, however their idea of pricing is different from my idea. Both are around $7000 Australian, that is about $6500 US.
    Can you advance some ideas as to how to do this without paying as much as twice and a half what I paid for the motor itself?
    Below is the list of item and prices quoted. Take off 10% for prices in US dollars.

     
  2. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    I do┬┤nt see where you could save some money in this case.
    Did you compare prices with "Lancing Marine"?
     
  3. Marco1
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Sydney

    Marco1 Senior Member

    Lancing does not produce a kit nor other parts for this engine, besides shipping anything out of the UK is prohibitive
     
  4. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    CDK retired engineer

    This supplier has you by the balls for the water jacketed manifold only. All the other parts you can purchase elsewhere at half the price or less.

    I marinized a pair of VW diesel engines and went shopping on the internet. Purchased manifolds from mesamarine.com, that were produced and shipped by Bowman in England, 40% under Lancing's bargain list price, transport included.
    Bought TMC-60 gearboxes, made by Technomarine in Italy (part of TwinDisc), from a small retailer in Germany for $900. That was less than half compared to marine24.com. But because he was very greedy with the SAE-5 adapter plate and the transmission damper plate I bought these from marine24.com.
    The seawater pump is a small brass pump from Johnson. Some suppliers want $600 for it, but I found a marine shop that was satisfied with $280.
    The flexible engine mounts I found elsewhere for under $25 each.
    The rubber hoses with 90 degree elbows were difficult to find. Gates USA has them in their program but their dealers do not have any stock because there is no demand for it.
    I mainly used straight hoses with copper elbows intended for central heating plumbing. Later I found a mail-order company in England that sells all sorts of parts for people who build there own cars.

    By not buying a complete set you can save several thousand $$.
    And if you feel really miserable about paying $1980 for the manifold, compare the engines exhaust flange dimensions with other small diesels. If you're lucky you may find one that can be modified to fit your engine, otherwise have a set of adapter flanges made.
     
  5. Marco1
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Sydney

    Marco1 Senior Member

    Hi there and thank you for your reply.

    I understand that the manifold includes the heat exchanger.
    That is the part that would cost more to have a one off made. There is a guy in Queensland who makes wet manifolds to measure for Detroit diesel and any other engine I could ask. But I think that by the time I get one plus the heat exchanger it will not be too different.

    I'll compare with another supplier http://www.wm-marine-diesel.com
    He did not give me a comprehensive list yet the total price is very close.

    It seems that I can cut a bit of fat from the gearbox, mounts and water pump. I think I just keep the original alternator. Houses and other bits and pieces I can find industrial suppliers.

    What do you make of the comment that I don't need an oil cooler?

    Kind Regards
    Marc
     
  6. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

    Marko,
    contact Stewart Butler sales@seawasp.com.au SEA WASP AUSTRALIA or Ph + 61 7 3348-5033
    Fax + 61 7 3348-5077
    Postal Address - PO Box 863, Wynnum Qld 4178
    Delivery Address - Shed 56 / 36 Barku Court, Hemmant Qld 4174
    www.seawasp.com.au

    They supplied my engine a 722cc Kubota... (Wattagan http://www.wattagan.com.au/index.html?target=p_8.html&lang=en-us added the delco 48V 100A alternators) the wet exhaust is engine coolant cooled and the cylindrical heat exchanges is separate (see images in my build thread - link in my signature area of every post) very good people...
     
  7. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    Yes, the manifold includes the heat exchanger and tank. Lancing has prices around 400 pounds for Ford and VW.

    Since the Kubota has no record breaking performance and will be used around 3000 rpm, you could skip the oil cooler. My engines are turbo charged, so they came with a miniature oil cooler mounted between the oil filter and its bracket. But the single loop in it is connected to the engine's cooling system that has already approx 90 C., so it cannot be very efficient.

    I purchased an oil cooling kit for the gearboxes because one is always in reverse. It appeared to be nothing more than a copper tube that is inserted in the gearbox after two brass plugs are removed....
     
  8. Marco1
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Sydney

    Marco1 Senior Member

    Hi Masali, e-mail sent. Thank you.

    CDK you have a sandwich oil cooler adaptor. They are OK. Compensates for the lack of cooling from a sump that is no longer catching wind. You could always get some of the sea water before it hits the heat exchanger and send it to cool the oil if you have o/heating issues. Small 1/2 inch pipe would do.

    I don't understand your gearbox set up. one always in reverse? Do you have opposit props yet same engines? Hmmm interesting. Wouldn't it be fun to get one of your egnines to go the other way? Yea OK may be too much work.

    How do you cool the oil in a mechanical gearbox that has no pump?
    Do you have the details of your German supplier for the TMC-60 Gearbox. That is the same I need.
    By searching for the german supplier I found another marinised Kubota in Germany. Ill try them too. Made in Croatia, I must say that the name is not a good start.
    http://www.krahwinkel-kpm.de/scam/scam.php
     
  9. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    The TMC-60s came from www.grieger-boote.de . They order everything from Allpa in the Netherlands, which is a major wholesaler/distributor for Europe.

    With opposite props, putting one gearbox in reverse is the common approach. For that purpose the TMC-60 can be ordered with 2:1 reduction in both fwd and rev.
    The copper tube which goes through the gearbox at the bottom is the first to receive seawater from the pump, so that cools pretty good. For the sandwich oil coolers on the engines that is no suitable solution: they are aluminum alloy and will quickly corrode away.

    I am familiar with Krahwinkel but discarded them as suppliers because of their ridiculous prices. And I agree with you that buying something from a company that calls itself Scam is asking for trouble.
     

  10. Marco1
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Sydney

    Marco1 Senior Member

    Good news!!!
    Got a reply from Sea Wasp and their 'kit' is $2,600 without the gearbox cover and plate. Still waiting on a quote for that.

    Yet even if they are not competitive in supplying those, I can still use the Parangon I have or buy a TMC60 from germany at $1600 Australian + shipping.

    Thank you both you saved me a mint. I'll start another thread when I have all the parts.
    Hooroo
    Marc
     
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