"Marine" spec outboards

Discussion in 'Outboards' started by claydog, Jul 27, 2017.

  1. claydog
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: michigan

    claydog Junior Member

    I realize this will likely vary by manufacturer, but is there a significant difference between Marine outboards and their fresh water brethren?
     
  2. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    A sticker and a few hundred bucks.

    Actually there are a few SS parts added that may or may not be needed, but it makes for good marketing.

    The standard models typically hold up fairly well, but the saltwater version "might" do slightly better. Most motors die prematurely from other causes than wearing out, so frequently any benefit from the additional SS parts may not be realized.
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    All outboards are engineered for salt water use. In the past, there were significant corrosion issues in at least two prominent brands, those have largely been addressed, by switching to more suitable aluminium alloys.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If you pull the parts lists for both versions of the same engine you'll find a significant number of different pieces. This is usually because they've found a problem that needed to be addressed, such as corrosion. They generally don't put parts on the engine they know will cause issues (or that they don't have too) and some things are simply common sense, but most manufactures do try to put a good, reliable product out there, so yep, there's a difference, little of it is arbitrary, because they also don't like to put things on the engine they don't need or isn't required.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Commercial type motors usually feature more robust water pumps, and extra corrosion protection in some cases.
     
  6. claydog
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: michigan

    claydog Junior Member

    Thanks for the replies, it's about what I thought. I ask as I'm looking at buying a new boat with the intent of keeping it when I retire to Florida 5-6 years from now. Living near the great lakes, none of the dealers in the area normally carry salt water series motors so I would have to order one as opposed to finding a good end of season deal.
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Were you thinking about Mercury engines ?
     
  8. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    If this will be a trailerable boat, and you pull the boat after each use, just give the outboard a good flushing with fresh water. It should last a long long time regardless if i t is the salt water version or not. The commercial versions are a little more rugged and will last longer, but they cost more and need the same routine maintenance as well as flushing after use.
     
  9. claydog
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    claydog Junior Member

    That would be my first choice, but I'm not against other brands if I see a compeling reason to go that route.
     
  10. claydog
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: michigan

    claydog Junior Member

    Definately trailerable, depending on where we end up buying it would most likely be kept on a lift when not in use.
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I don't see much corrosion around Mercury engines these days, it is a very long time since they had those problems .
     
  12. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    BlueBell "Whatever..."

    No, but there is a huge difference between after sales service.
    Buyer beware.
     
    boatbuilder41 likes this.
  13. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    You mean playing hard-ball on warranty claims, or........?
     

  14. boatbuilder41
    Joined: Feb 2013
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    Location: panama city florida

    boatbuilder41 Senior Member

    Just a little personal insight from a certified marine mechanic .... I work on all types of outboards daily... The. Engines i see with the most corrosion issues i see comes from suzuki engines.. The new tohatsu engines ( honda).. Claim to have a coating on the inside of the blocks and water passages as well... Making it much more corrosion resistant.... Honda is a very reputable name.. But ehatever brand you choose.. Make sure service is available in your area
     
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