Marine glue for wood boat

Discussion in 'Materials' started by pwillie, Jul 2, 2014.

  1. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    Picked up a quart of 105 West System....let you know how it works for my application...
     
  2. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    The boat is started...
     

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  3. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    New pics of progress
     

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  4. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    boat progress
     

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  5. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    New pics!
     

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  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    So, how much does it weigh ?
     
  7. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    It weighs less than 300 at this time...
     
  8. ceproof87
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    ceproof87 CE Boat Certification

    The 3M 5200 is a rubbery, polyurethane sealant and has a adhesive properties but sometime it can be used as a glue. Under water saturation it fails as a glue without high clamping pressure. it's not used as stand-alone marine glue.
     
  9. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yes, 3M-5200 is used as a stand alone adhesive (it's not a glue) and it's elasticity isn't as flexible as most of the other adhesive/sealants available (it's surprisingly stiff). I agree it needs to be well clamped on wooden or porous substrates, as it will release if not (underwater applications). I've seen plenty of lapstrakes ruined with this stuff for this reason.

    In this application, a traditional dory lap build, 3M-5200 will work, because the frames will do most of the work, while the goo just acts as an aggressive sealant. It has more than enough elongation (about 300%) to work in this role, though repairs will be a bugger.
     
  10. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    I am using west 305 for my screw plugs(mixed with saw dust) ...is there something better? Anything like a putty?
     
  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Well I'm not sure about your "West 305", but West System 405 is a filleting blend, which is a combination of silica, balloons, some talc and a touch of wood flour, ideal for filling screw holes and other fairing duties.
     
  12. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    OK,so will the 305 mixed with saw dust accomplish the same?....are do I need to get the 405?
     
  13. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The West site will tell you what these products do, though I don't know of a 305 filler material.

    Adding wood flour to 405 will make the fairing compound much tougher to sand, so yeah, you can fill screw holes with it, but it'll be harder to fair out afterward. Unless you have a load bearing situation around these filled screw holes, I don't see the need for anything else in the mix, except silica to control situation dependent viscosity requirements, such as vertical surfaces.
     
  14. pwillie
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    pwillie Junior Member

    I.m thinking about saturation of the cypress lapstrake,to counter rot...whats your take?
     

  15. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Cypress is a thirsty species and I'll bet it'll suck up a huge amount of weight in goo. Since you can't behind and under the frames and other areas now assembled, encapsulation isn't fully possible, so I'd think against it. Depending on the sub species, most cypress is fair rot resistant naturally and as a trailer boat, she can be permitted to dry out, so not as much a concern. My big concern with cypress planking like yours is, it looks to be flat sawn and pretty wide planks. With cypress, this means a lot of movement, testing each fastener and glue line, making a good argument for some sort of sealer.

    The planking will only rot if standing water is permitted to stay in the boat, so if you take care of her, keep her paint in good shape, you shouldn't have worries. Use a good epoxy based primer and keep her clean and dry.
     
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