Manie's TEN

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Manie B, Sep 15, 2014.

  1. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Kevlar (Aramid) wicks water, therefore an insignificant crack in the outside layer will cause the kevlar to wick the water in between the layers which endangers a long service life of the boat. This isn't a problem for one AIT trip but it's a problem if you want to keep the boat for a long service live.

    Many old race boats suffer from this problem, but they weren't intended for a long service life in the first place.

    Do a simple test, place a cup full of water next to an empty cup and hang a bunch of kevlar over the cups edges to the bottom of both cups, within an hour the water will start to migrate from the full to the empty cup and drip between the cups.
     
  2. DriesLaas
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    Location: South Africa

    DriesLaas Weekend Warrior

    That is a bleddie good plan!!! Pity the stuff is so expensive.
     
  3. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Meer en meer kwaai!
     
  4. Angélique
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

  5. Angélique
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Hi Fanie,

    Maybe the new Wharram Mana 24 could be a nice fishing boat for you, perhaps Dries can produce the kits for SA . . . :idea:

    I'll guess she's also suitable for the ‘‘Around-In-Max-One-Ton-(metric)-Total-Displacement-Race’’ which Sven suggested here . . .
    I suggest we call this ‘‘Around-In-One-Ton-Race’’ the ‘‘Sven-Yirvind-Challenge’’ :)
     
  6. MoeJoe
    Joined: Apr 2012
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    MoeJoe Junior Member

    Best of luck with the project Manie. Will be interesting to follow for sure.

    It's sort of funny that the "old salt" Yrvind with 50 years of blue-water sailing in tiny boats is going for experimental designs throughout, while you go opt for more of a traditional design and KISS. Different solutions to similar problems. Both might work well, or one might not.

    Reg. electricity, I'd say minimize your dependency of it, and for the stuff you do need, have backups on everything. 3 backpacking stoves don't take much room and their small gas canisters are convenient and reliable.

    Regarding your route- for it to be a "proper" around the world sailing for record books, you'd need to cross the equator, right? Wouldn't the original route be a lot more pleasant? Down there it's going to be dark, cold, windy, wet, 6 months of that might feel longer and be harder than 12 months of sun, warmth, and nice trade winds..

    Assuming that "things will break", which they probably will, at least partially, sooner or later, what backup plans do you have/are you considering regarding for example a broken mast, a smashed-in window, a broken rudder axle?
     
  7. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Pretoria South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

    MoeJoe very valid points and I will start by answering the basic ones first.

    My team and I are (hoping) planning many different voyages with this boat. We would like to start with the SaToSa concept first and then do the others later. This would include equator crossings as you mention. The idea is to hopefully have more than one "captain" so that when the one gets off the boat the next one could be ready to take off on another adventure, a relay team if you will. We also envisage three types of boats. Firstly this 10 that is short and fat for nonstop long distances, secondly a 12/13? that is skinny for hops that are 100? days apart, and thirdly a 15/16? built for 2 people.

    We will do very very thorough testing from Port Elizabeth and we will have backup systems. We are looking closely at spares and testing a backup kite that so far seems to be fairly good, in a better than nothing style. I am also testing different camping stoves and reducing dependency on electrical equipment. In the summer months the days are very long the further south you move and we hope that this factor will be of great help.

    We have the greatest respect for Sven's ability to think "out the box" but our approach is probably more conservative. I am confident that many different designs would be successful but we are going "old school" After many discussions that I have had with many different sailors we still feel that there is not enough data to disprove the concept of the full keel heavy displacement micro ship that I am building. As you know Wynand has built many steel yachts over the years so he also supports the strong and heavy thinking. I am making provision for the fact that should the full keel not give adequate directional stability and have a tendency to broach when running, we will be able to remove the keel and modify and/or go with something else, maybe bilge keels or even a similar system to Kenichi Horie. We still like the concept of the Flika http://www.flicka20.com/ with it's long keel. So bottom line is we need a platform with which we can experiment and I am building this boat with the attitude that it will work and therefore will be the boat to keep. Nobody has ever built a decent "TEN" that is applicable for this type of adventure so we need to start somewhere and get something on the water for all to see.

    I am sure that Sven will agree with me that the concept of a TEN will be proven sooner or later, maybe it wont be me, but somebody is going to do it, that I am 100% sure of. My partners in this endeavour support my thinking and that is why they came on board. Fair winds and happy sailing to all :D
     
  8. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Pretoria South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

  9. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Sounds like you guys are getting serious, but it sounds good. An adventure for sure...

    Angelique, I'm not a Wharram fan...
     
  10. DriesLaas
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    DriesLaas Weekend Warrior

    That Flicka is a nice little boat! Why did I forget about it?
     
  11. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Vancouver

    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Hey Manie ,congrats for not laying on the couch and watching life slip by.

    Anyways for cooking...try a solar oven.Build or buy,in the sun it'll get to 150C almost instantly
     
    1 person likes this.
  12. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Pretoria South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

    The past couple of weeks has just been insane, my feet never touched ground and I have just been super busy with this campaign. It simply is an unbelievable amount of work to set up all the internet accounts. I want to get the word out there as much as possible and I am hoping to get a little bit of funding (donations) at a later stage that could help to pay for expensive instrumentation etc. Every little bit helps. That is why I set up SaToSa on FB, Manie HJ Botha on Wordpress and Blogger, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+ and of course Youtube and Paypal.

    I'm hoping that when people see the hull been plated that they will start realising that this project is seriously underway.

    Anyway I am trying do as much as possible to all the components before assembly so that I minimise the amount of work to be done inside the boat, when it becomes very difficult to work in a confined space. And as you go along you do spot things that could be better and I am making those changes now already. Made some small changes to the jig as well. Lofting of the hull panels will start within the next 2 weeks and then we will have something that looks like a boat !!
     

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  13. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Manie B Senior Member

    sharpii2 I reposted this post of your here because it is very relevant to our way of thinking, thanks for the post:-

     
  14. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Pretoria South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member


  15. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "South Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    Hi Manie, instead of 1m600 wide, why don't you make it 2m ? It should give you a bit more righting force and a bit more space. 3m long is bad enough.

    Otherwise just make it 10m wide and three meters long :D Like the pilot who landed his plane complaining about the very short but unbelievably wide runway...
     
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