Malibu Outrigger

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by BobBill, Dec 16, 2011.

  1. BobBill
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    BobBill Senior Member

    Posted in wrong forum like an idiot.


    Anyone here built one and willing to entertain a few questions on it? Am thinking of buying plans and building, but thinking about trying different materials.

    Old boat/design; the perfect beach boat?
     

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  2. peterchech
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    peterchech Senior Member

    Not sure it is much better than a standard beach cat but still a cool boat.

    A guy with user name Petercress sailed one of those on Hawaii extensively, he is on the woodenboat forum. Most of his posts have been to the outrigger/proa thread in the designs section.
     
  3. keysdisease
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    I always thought the Malibu Outrigger was a very neat boat. It was the inspiration for Hobie Alter to design the Hobie Cat way back when after watching them beach launch and surf. Very few boat types can launch off a beach and sail (or power) through surf.

    Having learned to sail on a Hobie 14 and then moving up to a 16 I can't believe any better boat for surfing or more fun than a Hobie Cat. When you can find one they are pretty inexpensive and for the cost of a new tramp (they always seem to need one) a great boat.

    I would be concerned with getting caught aback in a proa in the surf, but of course the malibu Outrigger would be the lightest option.

    Steve:cool:
     
  4. peterchech
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    peterchech Senior Member

    The Malibu is a tacker, not a shunter, so prob wouldn't get caught aback in the sense I think you mean.

    Nonetheless, small shunting proas can certainly handle the surf. Just youtube "pjoa" and you will see two brave guys sailing through heavy baltic surf...
     
  5. BobBill
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    BobBill Senior Member

    Altered Malibu Outrigger Idea

    I do not plan to push out from big surf beaches, but you never know.

    I was wondering, if you are familiar with the MO design, it is a dagger board, narrow but flat bottom hull.

    In your view, would not a similar hull, but instead of flat bottom, designed with slightly deeper but narrow bottom as skeg to replace dagger board be as efficient, acting somewhat like say Hobie Getaway hull to limit sideway?
     
  6. keysdisease
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    Not to answer for Peter, but a dagger board will always outperform any kind of skeg or asymetric hull.

    Steve
     
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  7. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Keysdisease is right.

    You will never get equal performance going to windward, or even beam reaching with anything other than a board.

    IMHO.

    But it is just fine with me if you don't, that way if we ever sail together I can show off in spite of my poor sailing abilities.
     
  8. BobBill
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    BobBill Senior Member

    Altered Malibu Outrigger Idea

    Thanks MrUpchurch and Keysdisease, I thought as much, but wondered if there was some way around making and using dagger board...with very sharp and deeper entry stem to stern keel.
     
  9. keysdisease
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    Whatever the leeway prevention device, they are a compromise and anything that moves a pain to build and just "one more thing" when sailing. If fixed, adds draft. The asymetrical Hobie hulls compromised for ease of sailing, building and being a true beach cat, but they made much more leeway than a boat with boards.

    Many of us wish for "a way around" boards, but, "it's a boat."

    Steve:cool:


     
  10. BobBill
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    BobBill Senior Member

    Thank-you, Steve. You are correct, of course. I just cannot help wonder how that hull would work with its already narrow below water line shape deeper and sharper. It would remove the flat bottom forward, but, well, best to stick with original design.

    Now I understand the the joys of a test lagoon...Hey, MIT, you want to try it??? ;]

    Thanks again.
     
  11. Collin
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    Collin Senior Member

    I've looked at the plans and the boat before. I think there are better ways of putting a boat together now, but you could modify the out-dated parts of the boat and make something for the 21st century.
     
  12. BobBill
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    BobBill Senior Member

    Collin, I also thought as much...even using foam/carbon or glass or even sign board for hull.

    And should consider, a standard cat rig or even a Marconi jib rig, rotating mast, carbon perhaps and use of Hobie 14 starboard hull if found...or similar outrigger.

    But, the framing could not be simpler, to me, and carbon spars make sense, along with a quick-loosen, slider float outrigger booms for easy trailing, without hull dis-assembly.

    What did you have in mind?
     
  13. BobBill
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    BobBill Senior Member

    there is something wrong with me. I just finished redoing a wee dinghy and am flummoxed with ideas to build a MO...


    Have determined to incorporate some changes to fit current materials...

    May use foam/glass for hull, with Kevlar carbon on bottom...but, may use 1/8 sign board sandwich material.

    Cat rigged sail or sloop with short bowsprit...

    Rotating mast, 3 section, with Force 5 base, carbon top two sections...same or near same sail area, roach and luff, but cut for mast/boom, free footed.

    Have not decided on vang.

    Open interior between outrigger poles...or semi open for sitting ease...but.

    Weep holes with transom drain...

    Still working on way to trailer with easy set up...re outrigger poles.

    Have also thought about wave piercing bows...


    Comments are more than welcome.
     
  14. Collin
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    Collin Senior Member

    You could use Gary Dierking's designs and apply his method to the Malibu. You could make it so you could collapse it in to two hull sections even. His book doesn't cost much and it has 3 outrigger designs, including a plywood one.

    The Malibu is so cool, I wouldn't change the rig or the hull too much. Otherwise it isn't a Malibu.
     

  15. BobBill
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    BobBill Senior Member

    Thanks much for the references. I do not plan to alter the boat too much, but practical considerations enter into some of it...trailering and, for me, ease of sail.


    The semi open hull when under way should not be changing too much, and the rotating mast and cat rig sail, versus the crab-claw, makes sailing a wee bit easier for me. I can go either way with the sail/rig, but the cat should be efficient and the fittings are standard, easy to find.


    I perused the author's site and pics of cat with wave piercers and orig boat.


    Thanks much, again. Very helpful.


    PS...I understand about the MO kewlness, and will retain it. The pic is sort of what I had in mind.
     

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