Malcolm Tennant "Wild Thing" Tri

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by tanjera, Sep 28, 2014.

  1. tanjera
    Joined: Jul 2009
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: New Zealand

    tanjera Hennie

    HI there
    I am interested in one of these that are for sale locally but would like to hear from someone that has either owned one or sailed on one.
    The only literature I could lay my hands on are the usual sales blurbs.
    Much appreciated
    Hennie
     
  2. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 2,992
    Likes: 114, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 509
    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Andrew Bogle shared Taranui with a couple of friends, really liked the boat but then sold it to Australia. You are after Careless Intent and for a short time, I had a rush of blood - but then calmed down, don't need another boat, have three to look after. But the design is excellent except it is low wooded having been designed, the original boat, built at Peter Sowman's, forgotten its name, for the Canadian lakes - but imo all that is required is to make the two float daggerboards into L shaped foils; that will keep the lee float higher. I saw both boats, Taranui and Intent, being built in Bay of Islands years ago but haven't sailed on either - but did sail on the smaller version named Demon Tricycle - which was an excellent and fast boat too.
     
  3. tanjera
    Joined: Jul 2009
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: New Zealand

    tanjera Hennie

    Hi Gary
    Thanks for the feedback - much appreciated however I do not get your:"except it is low wooded having been designed"??
    Hennie
     
  4. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 2,992
    Likes: 114, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 509
    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Malcolm was asked to design the boat for a US or Canadian sailor who lived on a large lake so MT designed a low wooded boat, meaning the floats and hulls are of quite low freeboard (because you don't get high waves in lakes compared to the sea) so even though the design has over-length floats (he would be the first to have done this) when powered up the lee float is often close to being buried. Nothing wrong with that, low freeboard give less windage, is lighter, also looks good, fast. However when MT drew the boat, foils were not well known - and it would be a simple task to make the float daggers into L foils .... and then you would have more power to carry sail, float does not bury, more speed, safety. The design is perfect for this.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
    Posts: 1,223
    Likes: 41, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    L boards

    Gary, since you brought it up ;) How would you go about actually engineering/building an L-board for a tri this size without getting too exotic? I am certainly convinced they would be a nice upgrade.
    B
     
  6. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
    Posts: 2,121
    Likes: 54, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    The beam and connective loads would get higher but you could make an argument about reducing the shock loads from the waves.
     
  7. HydroNick
    Joined: Apr 2010
    Posts: 87
    Likes: 3, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: British Columbia

    HydroNick Nick S

    I recall There was either a video or photos...I think a video...of two "Wild Things" in strong winds. One did a near endo but (as I recall) recovered nicely. They were smoking along. Maybe someone has a link to the photos/ video. Good luck with the purchase.
     
  8. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 3,757
    Likes: 182, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 826
    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    It was in the Whitsundays and the other background boat was a Grainger 075 trimaran "Sirocco". It was pretty hairy but the tennant trimaran saved itself and went on to complete the race :)

    http://thecoastalpassage.com/driven_in.html
     
  9. tanjera
    Joined: Jul 2009
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: New Zealand

    tanjera Hennie

    Thanks for all the contributions guys - much appreciated.
    Will certainly investigate the l-shaped foils if I buy her - all depends on the $'s
    Keep it coming
    Hennie
     
  10. Gary Baigent
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 2,992
    Likes: 114, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 509
    Location: auckland nz

    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Bruce, on your B24, since you're talking about fitting foils to the floats and presumably retaining your main hull centreboard, therefore the foils do not have to be large and I'd say pretty similar to the ones on Sid; you could laminate the foils with stripped wood and epoxy into a soft turning L, (using blocks nailed to your shed floor and bending with clamps) and when cured grind away the thickest section areas where the loads are at their highest and lay in half a dozen layers of uni-directional carbon both sides.
     
  11. Marmoset
    Joined: Aug 2014
    Posts: 380
    Likes: 3, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 39
    Location: SF Bay Area

    Marmoset Senior Member

    I know on its own balsa is a poor choice, but if it's carbon wrapped and glass it should suffice for a foil shouldn't it? I just had the though one could do the sand out a foil in hardwood trick, the. Split it in a saw few times and space balsa between and shape that to it. The. One could build the foil curved then slather on the cloth and epoxy. He'll even drill to set it on a pre bent aluminum rod, No?


    Barry
     
  12. basil
    Joined: Apr 2005
    Posts: 154
    Likes: 8, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 55
    Location: aUSTRALIA

    basil Senior Member

    I have a feeling that the Wild Thing tri that was built of varnished timber that went Canada was named "Wild Thing".
    I believe the red tri in the Whitsundays has conventional looking floats these days. Maybe they had a few too many near endos going on.

    Tony
     
  13. jamez
    Joined: Feb 2007
    Posts: 505
    Likes: 28, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 231
    Location: Auckland, New Zealand

    jamez Senior Member

    Looked to me like the bow overhangs had been clipped. There was another thread here or on SA that mentioned this and had some more pics of the boat.
     
  14. jamez
    Joined: Feb 2007
    Posts: 505
    Likes: 28, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 231
    Location: Auckland, New Zealand

    jamez Senior Member

    Found a pic of it:
     

    Attached Files:


  15. warwick
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 423
    Likes: 7, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 63
    Location: papakura south auckland new zealand

    warwick Senior Member

    could the clip float bows have had some thing to do with the length it was being measured at.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.