Malaysian needing advice

Discussion in 'Education' started by Ryan Miri Magic, Oct 4, 2008.

  1. Ryan Miri Magic
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Ryan Miri Magic Junior Member

    Hi I'm a 17 year old Malaysian finsihing my last year of high school. I am a state sailor and have been sailing since I was 10 in both keelboat(30ft beneteaus, sydney 46) and dinghy(lasers,470s,etc.) classes. I am interested in pursueing a career in boat design or naval architecture in the future since I am hugely interested in sailboats and am keen in desigining and arts. After high school i will only have obtained my high school finals certificate (SPM) and so I plan to continue my studies to achieve my goals. So far I have figured out that i need to take an undergraduate course (ex:A-Levels) in order to study boat designing abroad since Malaysia doesnt provide such courses and my Malaysian high school finals cert arent very well recognised at most international universities. My question is I would like to know all the possible educational routes to a career in boat design and architecture (whether it be through an undergrad course or not)?Maybe even a foundation year or apprecenticeship?


    I have already researched the AMC,UNSW and Newcastle university degrees regarding naval architecture and boat design. However these courses may be slightly pricey for me. Any additional information regarding the courses at the stated universities is greatly recieved.

    All advice, opinions and information is welcome. :)
     
  2. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Hi Ryan

    Funnily enough i have just returned from a biz trip to Malaysia!

    It all depends on the level of education you want to achieve and whether you are more theory based or practical based. Since, sadly these days, with education it does at a price. You could opt for a HND/Diploma type, or the full blown Degree. However, some universities are not so good as others, as I'm sure you have found out already.

    Also, do you want a university that teaches more pure "technical" or more "practical"...on top of this, some universities are influence by their local market, such as Strathclyde Uni - Offshore, or in some cases by their main funding partners. UCLA is very much influence by "traditional heavy engineering"

    I would recommend, Newcastle Uni, also Southampton Uni. In Southampton there is also another Solent university, which was once a college, more practical based, is also very good. This may be cheaper?

    Have you looked at Singapore and HK?

    In Australia, Curtin Uni is also worth checking out. Maybe Stellenbosch Uni in South Africa too.

    But, since your interests lay in smaller craft, i would recommend both uni's in Southampton, they include this field. I did my masters at Southampton Uni. Curtin may be a good choice too, as they are doing more courses in small naval architecture.

    Doesn't answer your Q...but gives you food for thought.
     
  3. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Ryan,

    Westlawn would be perfect for your application mate as you can study from home and previous experience is not a requirement.
     
  4. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Westlawn is ok for those that wish to "dabble" in naval architecture. But it is not a serious educational course if you wish to do more than just "some drawings and basic calculations" for yourself.
     
  5. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Ad Hoc,

    And you know this to be correct???????

    Many graduates of Westlawn have gone onto to some very good design and construction work, I think that you may be a bit surprised to find out the truth.
     
  6. Ryan Miri Magic
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    Ryan Miri Magic Junior Member

    Ad Hoc:
    hope u enjoyed your trip! thanks for the advice :) do you hv any suggestions for sgpore or hk unis?..I never knew tht curtins did small boat design courses?!! my city has a branch of their university but unsuprisingly small boat design is not offered.But i will look into the australian campus.
    How abt the job market for small boat architects?or just naval architecture in general? is it hard to find jobs? are u working in this field?

    Landlubber:
    thanks mate i'll go have a look at their website! would u know how long it takes to complete a course? cheers
     
  7. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Landlubber
    Im not saying its bad. It is just not as good as a full-time 3~4year degree course. It cannot touch the depth of a full blown lectured full-time course in just 38 lessons! Horses for course really...an acid test is to see if the course is recognised to be a full member of RINA or SNAME and hence being a Chartered Engineering

    Ryan
    Ngee Ann Polytechnic in Singapore offers degree courses. I'm mistaken, i'm going on old info. There are no longer any recognised university marine engineering or naval architecture programmes available in Hong Kong, except for some postgraduate courses.

    Jobs, as in any filed are hard to find. Yes, I am a naval architect, as i mentioned above, i did my masters at Southampton. It is a very rewarding job. It also has many disciplines too....something for everyone!

    I would recommend finding a shipyard in Malaysia and asking them to fund your education. Having just returned from Malaysia, not one single yard has their own in-house naval architect. All design work is subcontracted. A few "older yard's" have one or two 'design staff', but not a proper design office. The Malaysian govt has identified the problem and want the Malaysian shipbuilding industry to grow. The only way it will grow is if the shipyards are able to control the design aspects and promote their own....so worth exploring and seeing if you can get some to assist you...if you can, then you could go anywhere.
     
  8. Ryan Miri Magic
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    Ryan Miri Magic Junior Member

    thanks ad hoc
    i checked ngee ann and the nearest thing to naval architecture is a Diploma in Marine & Offshore Technology (MOT). ok thanks Hong Kong has a pretty high living expense anyway.
    okay haha i have heard that it was a hard field to get into but there is an upthrust of boat building markets in europe. I'm not really fussed over pay as long as i can live suitably i'm fine.

    Now thats a thought! Do u have any suggestions of shipyards? When u say yards do u mean yards for leisure yachts and craft?
     
  9. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    There are many shipyards in Malaysia, just do a Google search.

    However, you need to aim for one that specialises in smaller boats, rather than large boats. It would also be worth becoming a student member of RINA, it is cheap and you'll get access to loads of info too.

    Oh i read recently that Ngee Ann has just started a full-time degree
     
  10. danial
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    danial Junior Member

    hi fellow malaysian, how about joining me in UniKL MIMET(Malaysian Institute of Marine Engineering Technology) in lumut perak. it is a 6 year old institute. You can enroll in diploma in ship design or the newly introduced degree in naval architecture and shipbuilding after A level. it is recognized and most of the graduates have no problem finding jobs. If you're a bumiputra, you can take loan from MARA.
     
  11. Ryan Miri Magic
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    Ryan Miri Magic Junior Member

    Ad Hoc: Ok I will do some research on the shipyards available..thanks for all the help and advice please tell me if u do find any additional info :)

    Danial: Hi danial! Hmmm i've never heard of it before but it sounds promising. Is it an IPTA or IPTS? How many years is the degree program? Yes I am bumi so i can probably get a loan if needed.Do u have an estimation of the fees?
     
  12. Ryan Miri Magic
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    Ryan Miri Magic Junior Member

    Another question Ad Hoc..What if I were to take a Bachelor of Science (hons)(Architecture)? Would I be able to branch out into shipbuilding in the future?
     
  13. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Ryan
    I'm not sure what you have been told, or understand, nor which field you want to branch into, but.....if you get a degree in naval architecture, from a reputable university, and become a full RINA member and also a chartered engineer, you can do anything in the field of ship building.
    This is not to say you can't do any if you have none listed, you can. I have friends who are in Production managers position with little or no qualifications. But this took them many many years of hard work on the shop floor welding/fabricating and slowly rising up through the ranks. I trust their judgements without question too, because they have been there done that. BUT..if you wish to be in a position making decisions, and dictating design issues or a production manager etc, in a shorter time frame, then a degree makes you more technically qualified to make such decisions and as such you will achieve your goal quicker.

    Whatever you decide, there is no substitute for working or being involved with a shipyard. There are far too many "designers" out there will little or no shipyard experience. As such their designs and decisions made are based purely on technical issues alone and sit behind a computer and discuss which software is better rather than what is really required by the design for the client. This may well suit them, but what is it 'we' are designing? Design and production go hand in hand and as such, you must always discuss your "objectives" with the guys making it!...to make it easier to build, cheaper to build and also so you know what capabilities the yard has. No point asking for a nuclear power plant if they only have wooden sticks and matches to light afire!

    So, getting back to your question...if you want to get into shipbuilding, ie productions issues, more than ship design per se, then it is best to choose a degree that has a greater emphasis on production and engineering. However, any naval architecture degree will cover such issue. I strongly suggest that you contact shipyards and, if only to go in and have a look around, and see if it excites you. Also guys on the shop floor can teach you so much....never ignore them. Visiting a shipyard will be very informative for you...and probably help you decide where you would like to go.
    But if you change your mind after you get into production...your degree will enable you to drift into design, or research or marine journalism etc etc.

    Good luck ;)
     
  14. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    #13 Well said, and very appropriate.
     

  15. danial
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    danial Junior Member

    it is an IPTS owned by MARA, the degree programe is 4 years... the fees is about RM4000-5000 per semester.. for more information, check www.unikl.edu.com
     
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