Making boats for export what would you accept for engine beds in glass ???

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by tunnels, May 31, 2011.

  1. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    Engine beds for stern drive engines to be mounted onto and Ips units have a spacific details supplied by Volvo as a minimum lay up But i cant get any details on the actual engine beds as a minimum acceptable lay up so i throw the question to every one !!:confused:
    What is acceptable and how would you make them ??
    The size of the engines are all in the 300 hp and above range possibly up to 500 hp as a single . :mad:
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Do you mean the beds for an engine mated to an IPS?
     
  3. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

  4. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    Yeah got and read all that plus the pages of laminate for the ips units but its the engine beds that the motors actually rest on top of !!!

    Would you accept wood glassed over ??: Or foam shaped and glassed over with steel plates inside the glass as specified by Volvo :idea:but there is no mimimum aceptable lay up for the beds themselves ,so that is what i am asking . :confused:
     
  5. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    You got it !! most motors will be 250 hp and above . not only ips but stern drive as well with mostly diesel motors . :confused:
     
  6. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

  7. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    Thats the idea but a little simpler does it have steel plates to drill into and tap a thread so the mounts can be bolted straight onto the glass pad
    ??:confused:
     
  8. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    Sorry dont know all the details on the design suggest you email Kurt it may take a few days for a reply though, he is in Uganda working on a ferry project till June 2nd.
     
  9. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Oh yes there is.. In most scantling rules me thinks. In the Dave Gerr's Elements of Boat Strength anyway.
    BR Teddy
     
  10. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    For both IPS and Outdrives the engine beds themselves will be non thrust taking. This means they will not have to be built with thrust in mind, only the static and dynamic loads and torque.

    As for steel plates in the laminate, I prefer channels in alum or steel capping the stringers and built in such a way to allow bolting the mounts. You can also use non thrust taking mounts in these applications which will isolate engine vibrations better than thrust taking mounts. Mounts will also work best when the structure is stiff, allowing them to isolate better, so don't forget athwartship bracing to stiffen the stringers.

    Steve
     
  11. Herman
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Herman Senior Member

    Hi Steve,

    Can you produce a sketch of what you mean with channels, capping the stringers? How do you attach the cappings to the stringer?

    Also, when you have flexible engine mounts, do not forget to include a flexible coupling to the IPS or axle, or it will cost an end bearing yearly.
     
  12. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    These two pictures are examples, not the best but what I have in my files. The "cap" is an upside down U channel that is through bolted through the stringers. The actual mount "pad" is elevated to allow thru bolting of the engine mount. This is much more secure than tapping into a steel plate glassed to a stringer.

    All remote thrust engine arrangements I am familiar with, including IPS, have either U joints, CV joints or some other flexible coupling at either end of the jack shaft connection.

    http://www.marinepartsexpress.com/V...MISSIONS/Connecting kit for Volvo Penta 0.pdf


    Steve


     

    Attached Files:


  13. Herman
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Herman Senior Member

    OK, the cap is held in place with through-bolts through the sides of the stringer. That would need some provision for strength in the laminating scheme. This must be for larger engines, say 400 hp and more?

    The raised mounts is a good idea, if there is room for it. Of course it causes the stringer itself to be lower, which needs to be possible, strengthwise. At least you can grind off the bolts with an angle grinder, if needed at some point in its life.
     
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