Making a "Park Avenue" Boom

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Meanz Beanz, Jun 27, 2007.

  1. Meanz Beanz
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    I want to make a "Park Avenue" boom, sort of like this one...

    [​IMG]

    Its about 3.8m long, to suit a Seawind 24. If you are not familiar with the idea basically its just a wide boom that is used with Lazy Jacks to provide a platform to catch the mainsail. A cover is attached to each side and zips up the centre. Its a quick easy way to store the main.

    I need advice on construction, thinking along the lines of forming it in foam/cedar and glass/carbon with epoxy. Maybe be setting up to vacuum bag it. I am not sure which combination of materials will suit the best. I don't think that weight is the overriding concern, not to heavy but strong is good. Is cedar/carbon/epoxy a bit mad? I'm thinking that foam will be a problem if fittings need to move, be added etc.

    Any thoughts?

    MBz
     
  2. Meanz Beanz
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

  3. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    I would think weight is the major concern. In a beam swell in light air, wouldn't a weighty boom tend to knock the shape out of the sail?
    Another question, wouldn't it be difficult at times to see the sail shape from below?
    A freind made a simpler boom----- light but wide, for a big tri. Instead of a big structure, he molded a few pairs of struts to each side of the boom and terminated the lazy jacks on the struts. Plenty of room to flake the sail, did everything a wider boom would do, made a good tent support, but very light and simple.
    The struts were glass over foam, I think, screwed on to an aluminum extrusion boom. Oval-section pylons, maybe 12" base to tip, so his sail-catching area was about 30" wide.
    If end plate effect is the desired result, struts as described could be fitted with fabric panels or flexible window material (to see through).
    Gybing a big boom like the one pictured, maybe half the sail on it when reefed adding to the weight, no thanks.
    That one Meanbeanz shows... looks like it would make a screamer of a dinghy all by itself!
    Construction--- surfboard style--- sculpted from foam with bulkheads buried in the foam ahead of time, acetone poured in to cavities to melt foam out, kevlar and/or carbon, ply patches at key attachment points, all fasteners machine screws into threaded aluminum-reinforced epoxy putty, would be light and strong.
    Alan
     
  4. frosh
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    frosh Senior Member

    I want one!

    Got to agree with Alan on many of his points. Weight will be a big not a small issue, especially when that monster is moving rapidly in a gybe. Can anyone let me know where I can get one. Looks like it would go like stink with a modern high aspect sail and big outriggers to hike off.
     
  5. catsketcher
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    catsketcher Senior Member

    Go the struts

    Hello Meanz

    It looks like the Seawind is getting a total makeover. I think the weight of the park avenue boom may be much higher than the alloy one. I went on board the new Sobedo yesterday and they had stuts as stated by Frosh et al.

    A mate of mine has made a park avenue attachment that goes on top of his normal boom. It is made from 10mm Nomex which is kerfed to get a curve into it. It is light and strong. You could do the same thing with Duflex. This would be easier to do than a whole boom.

    cheers

    Phil Thompson
     
  6. Meanz Beanz
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    When I said weight was not the primary concern I was still thinking light. Im' not sure that cedar would end up that heavy that it is an issue, but maybe. The mainsail is quite heavily battened so holds shape v well.

    If you can see the sail shape from bellow on a SW24 you have probably been knocked out and are just comming to! LOL This one is not a concern, the front end of the boom is about 300mm of the deck.

    The current extrusion is about 76mm / 3" in diameter, that is a good idea but I'd have to think about how it would work with what I have.

    The pics are of Carbon Foam pro jobs, they are a little on the bulky side for what I want but they are the best I could find to illustrate the idea.

    Thanks for the input Alan.

    Cheers
    MBz
     
  7. Meanz Beanz
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    I'm placing weight as second to strength because I cruise not race. I do want it as light as possible yet functional but I won't double the cost to save grams. Maybe that is a better way of putting it.

    Cheers
    MBz
     
  8. Meanz Beanz
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    Hey Phil,

    Yeah, I have to work out what it would weight, maybe the attachment idea is a good one. Not thinking as bulky as the pics, just enough to contain the main easily & make pack-up quick. I have a tendency to sail for longer than I should, always rushing back LOL

    Cheers
    MBz
     
  9. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    I think the effective solution would be fabric stretched from wide points. Structure isn't necessary----end plate effect is just a surface or barrier. Regarding flaking and gathering the sail, likewise, fabric is ideal.
    I picture maybe four light conical struts with bases that are molded to match the boom. They are screwed into the boom and a length of light (3 oz) dacron is stretched tight to form a very shallow V. Not five pounds would be added to the boom's weight if the struts were carbon over foam.
    another solution would be to use two aluminum tubes sprung out to each side, an elongated "eye" shape from above, with a pair of struts to stiffen along the length, then cover with fabric. Maybe safer in case bonked.
    Cheap, light, does the job, looks okay. Can also have a zip-up cover rolled and tucked on each side.

    Alan
     
  10. Meanz Beanz
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    Now there's some food for thought!

    Thanks Alan.
     
  11. Meanz Beanz
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    I was thinking that for a crusing boat these things would make a great fresh water catcher... skin fitting on the mast end and a tube into the tank. No?
     
  12. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Good idea. If the mast rotates. If not still doable. What comes down the sail would be substantial. Hey....
     
  13. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    kickin' back in my high tech boom hammock

    That boom looks groovy Meanz Beanz & if wide enough would make like a stretcher hammock & even better with some cushions, imagine kikin' back in that as you harness the powers of the elements, but you might find it "interacts" with the shrouds when sheeted out, butterfly frames of staino or alu tube with or without the fabric work nice & 2 or 4 "wings" leaving out the bit of boom in line with the shrouds may be the way to go esp' if you've got the original boom, although I do like the boom you've shown heaps. Regards from Jeff:cool:
     
  14. DanishBagger
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    DanishBagger Never Again

    How about a boom shaped somewhat like a windsurfer-boom - you know, like a compressed oval. You could use cloth or string between the two poles - string would be enough to hold the sail, but the cloth would work as an "end-cap". Heck, if done properly, the sail-cover could double as the end-cap by simply having it on top of the strings.

    This way you could propably make it just about the same wight as the boom you have now, and you wouldn't have struts sticking out, wating to hit you in the eye.
     

  15. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Yeah, struts would impale the unwary. The split boom, with a couple of cross-bars, is a good idea. Unzip, drop the sail, zip back up. Tramp webbing under.
     
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