Mahogany Finish on 1954 Lyman

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Tinklespout, Mar 2, 2013.

  1. Tinklespout
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    Location: Fl

    Tinklespout Junior Member

    Any suggestions for a temporary protector until I get it all stripped? I'd like to varnish the top all at once. It will be out of the water and covered anyway. I'll be using it in saltwater. Im thinking about something that will be good to soak into the wood anyway and then allow varnishing afterwards.
    THANKS!
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Teak oil will work well. Keep away from linseed oil which will blacken and stain the wood.
     
  3. Tinklespout
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    Location: Fl

    Tinklespout Junior Member

    Gonzo,
    Thanks, that's what I was thinking too. I want to do this thing right but my wife hates all of my "works-in-progress".
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Tinklespout; many a good wife does not understand the passion that a man feels for his boat. Your classic old Lyman is worthy of that passion.

    I trust that you know our Florida weather is a great enemy of even the finest varnish. You will need many coats of the stuff. Be sure to keep that lovely old girl under cover when not in use. The boat, I mean, not the wife.
     
  5. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    You shouldn't normally need anything to cover the wood while stripping the rest. I would only be concerned if you bought the boat where it was a lot drier (or humider) than the current situation.
    If the boat has been sitting for a while in the same locale/humidity, it should already be stabilized to that environment, especially if you are covering it. The sun and rain and wind will upset the wood if it isn't covered outside but I assume you'll be covering it.
    If the hull will be finished bright, a coat of varnish mixed 50/50 with mineral spirits will do the job but don't do it if you will be staining later. Sand and prep and stain first prior to any sealing of the surface.
    Some lymans had painted lapstrake hulls and used plywood strakes. In that case, no sealing would be needed in any case due to plywood being very stable. If solid wood strakes or planks, and you will be painting the hull, an oil based primer would be fine.
     

  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Lymans where stained with a special color, then varnished. I wouldn't oil it, just because it's not going to protect it from much. Water will still get through and sun light will still cause damage.

    Contact Tom Koroknay at Koroknay's Marine in Ohio (>lymanboat.com<) and get the proper color to stain the surface. In the mean time, just keep it dry, clean and covered, until you're ready to do the job.
     
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