lug sail rigging info

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Dirteater, Feb 23, 2011.

  1. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 203
    Likes: 21, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Canada

    Dirteater Senior Member

    Hi all,

    I'm hoping someone might be able to point out any good books
    regarding Lug type sails. ie: types (standing/balance etc, rigging knots.
    I can't seem to find any really well detailed info on this subject.

    Wouldn't mind if there's a great book on all kinds of sail configurations.

    thanks,
    DE
     
  2. CutOnce

    CutOnce Previous Member

    Here's a start.

    --
    CutOnce
     
  3. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 203
    Likes: 21, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Canada

    Dirteater Senior Member

    Thanks CO,

    I have see that link and it is pretty good, and having read more I realized there's probably many more options and styles. I do wonder if such a book even exists.

    thanks again,
    DE
     
  4. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 4,707
    Likes: 315, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1485
    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    A book exists: Spritsails and Lugsails by John Leather, Adlard Coles, 1979 (ISBN: 0229115179 / 0-229-11517-9 )
    Unfortunately it's been out of print for a while and asking prices for used copies are not inexpensive. Most of the book is about boats which had spritsails and lugsails. One lengthy chapter, 59 pages, discusses many variations of lugsail rigging and has a number of good drawings.
     
  5. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 4,707
    Likes: 315, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1485
    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    The Working Guide to Traditional Small-Boat Sails by David L. Nichols is a recent book which seems to be aimed at the backyard builder of smaller boats.

    100 Small Boat Rigs by Phil Bolger, International Marine, 1984 shows 100 rigs with Bolger's comments and opinions about each. Also out of print and not inexpensive.
     
  6. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,303
    Likes: 185, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2281
    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    Spritsails & Lugsails by John Leather 1979, reissued 1989......International Marine ISBN 0-87742-998-7.......Long out of print but available used (expensive) because it is the definitive work......Also see a series of articles on rigs by Iain Oughtred in some early issues of WoodenBoat Magazine. Also 103 Sailing Rigs by Phil Bolger which is still in print I think.......
     
  7. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 4,707
    Likes: 315, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1485
    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    Looks like there are two similar titles by Bolger:
    100 Small Boat Rigs, 261 pages, published by International Marine in 1984 and reprinted several times by them and H. H. Payson. http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/Boo...rl=an=bolger&sts=t&tn=small+boat+rigs&x=0&y=0 http://www.amazon.com/Small-Boat-Ri...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1298489749&sr=1-1
    103 Small Boat Rigs, 280 pages, published by Phil Bolger and Friends in 1998. http://www.amazon.com/103-Sailing-R...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1298489949&sr=1-1

    I wonder if the differences between are more than the addition of 3 rigs and 19 pages. All appear to be out of print.
     
  8. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 203
    Likes: 21, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Canada

    Dirteater Senior Member

    Thanks guys,

    that's perfect!
    I'll dig'em up.


    DE
     
  9. BATAAN
    Joined: Apr 2010
    Posts: 1,614
    Likes: 99, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1151
    Location: USA

    BATAAN Senior Member

    "Inshore Craft of Britain in the Days of Sail and Oar" by Edgar J. Marsh has many small details of halyards, cleating, leads, and practical use etc in the various chapters on small sailing work boats.
     
  10. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 203
    Likes: 21, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Canada

    Dirteater Senior Member

    thanks again for your help Bataan,

    Looks like I'm gonna have to shell out some bucks,
    none of these are available at any of my local libraries. dang!

    awwwh... the price we pay for knowledge...
    still, I really enjoy reading this stuff...

    DE
     
  11. BATAAN
    Joined: Apr 2010
    Posts: 1,614
    Likes: 99, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1151
    Location: USA

    BATAAN Senior Member

    I may be an old fogey (well, okay, not maybe) but I have always considered it a duty to preserve the ways that things were done before the use of oil, not because they were better, but because they were possible and should not be forgotten, or all of us lose. Let your average vessel run her tanks dry and she's toast. This photo is Bolinas CA in 1870s showing the small schooners that carried local produce like potatoes and cabbages through the narrow entrance past a bad reef and breaking shoals back and forth to San Francisco like the trucks today. One is hove down in the foreground for some bottom work. Nobody today ever seems to think about how to carry stuff without fuel or batteries or sunlight making it all work, but these guys were pretty good at it.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 203
    Likes: 21, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Canada

    Dirteater Senior Member

    Hi Bataan,
    I do agree (being a bit of a folgy myself)

    is that pic from the book you mentioned?

    "Inshore Craft of Britain in the Days of Sail and Oar" by Edgar J. Marsh
     
  13. BATAAN
    Joined: Apr 2010
    Posts: 1,614
    Likes: 99, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1151
    Location: USA

    BATAAN Senior Member

    No, Bolinas CA USA historical web site. Mine was a scan but here's a higher rez from them and shows the bar in the background.
    Little schooners like this were widely used in SF bay region 1840s to 1870s when the more practical scow schooners took over all the bay trade, though Bolinas kept this fleet going longer than elsewhere.
    These little vessels are poorly documented but seem to have been 35 to 55 feet generally and carried cord wood, lumber, bricks, or whatever. They had to be small to get in and out of this place
     

    Attached Files:

  14. BATAAN
    Joined: Apr 2010
    Posts: 1,614
    Likes: 99, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1151
    Location: USA

    BATAAN Senior Member

    And if you look in the foreground you get a great deck view of a small working sloop, so typical of the US coasts at the time that few bothered to draw, describe or photograph them.
     

  15. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 203
    Likes: 21, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Canada

    Dirteater Senior Member

    Yes, I noticed to sloop right off the start.
    great looking boat. I also like how busy
    this little harbour area is.

    Between to sloop, work boats and tenders and barges,
    your picture has quite the selection to choose from.
    I am somewhat new to boating but it is the history that
    has really drawn my attention. Over the past year I have done
    some great reading. however your probably right, ... "that
    there is probably a lot of information missing from the past as it
    was not documented". heck, I don't know anyone who's currently documenting thier daily working lives :D (and perhaps should be.)

    DE
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.