Love Boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by kostisoutback, Feb 9, 2016.

  1. kostisoutback
    Joined: Feb 2016
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    kostisoutback Junior Member

    upchurchmr thank you for the links. Thank you all for posting.

    I have a Grampian 26 that it was a mess with no cockpit, sized engine, water down below up to the knee. Now working on the cosmetics. But she sails. I just don't like it. And every boat costs money as a mistress. So I rather pay the sexy one. the way i see it is If i can be putting in 1000$ a month I would rather put it in the one I love the most.

    I understand the thing about the experience, and I am grateful that you care enough to point to the way that makes sense. But for me its like that. I think Asian cars are the smartest choice for a consumer. cheaper parts, live long, low gas costs etc, low everything. But life it too short to be driving around on a Toyota. Rather have a used Euro car. Or a big American truck. What I am trying to say is, that we make compromises every day. Should we make compromises on the things that are very important to us?
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yacht design is all about compromises, so is selecting a design, be this a used boat, a new boat or even a custom design. It's a bit like thinking about your dream car. Everyone wants a Lambo, because it looks good, sounds good handles very well, etc., but it also has no trunk, nor a place to put golf clubs let alone groceries or a child seat and gets single digit gas mileage. This means you settle on a Camaro, because it looks good, though not as sexy as the Lambo. It handles pretty well, sounds good and has a trunk, which will accept a bag of clubs and a few bags of groceries too, plus can carry twice the number of people, including the car seat for little Johnny and it'll get three times the gas milage too.

    The Archer style of pilot cutter is the 1950's Volvo wagon of the bunch. It's got some room in it, though comparatively, not as much as a modern design. It has a good safety reputation, though by modern standards it's not as good as you might think. It's slow and doesn't maneuver very well, kind of truck like, but the ride is fairly soft, like a '53 Buick. It'll leak and smell, but it'll have lots of charm to keep you excited about the next repair project you'll have to consider before year's end. This is the reality of an old school pilot cutter and something I don't think you realize. I own and have owned several old, traditionally built boats and you simply just have no idea, what it takes to keep them in good order. It's a lot of work, a continuous and ongoing thing, that you can't avoid. Replacing garboards, leaks, recaulking, fixing leaks, mechanical R&R's, upgrades, leaks, rig and sail inventory maintenance and upgrades, leaks. Did I mention leaks. Old, traditionally built pilot boats, especially those that have seen hard service in rough condisions, leak, particularly their laid decks, usually right over the bunk you're trying to sleep in. If you're not familiar with these traits, then I'm sure you have no idea what you're in for in regard to ownership of this type of boat. In fact, if you do get a traditionally built boat, most insurance companies will not touch you, simply because statistically, they know what's going to happen (and they're right), so they want to avoid the inevitable claims you'll make.

    In short, I'm not trying to talk you out of your dream, but just to suggest you beg, borrow and/or steal rides on this type of boat (traditionally built gaffers), so you can a feel for what they can and can't do/offer. Your desires and choices about the dream yacht is an ever evolving thing. Without much experience, you have no idea what you want and you'll end up getting a second mortgage for the new Lambo, when all your really need is a Camaro.
     
  3. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    The Virtue 30 is another good example. Great boat in a storm, if you don't mind things caving in here and there, but the old fellow here with one, "Gannet", seems to be getting most of his enjoyment out of restoring and maintaining her. Still, it is a design small enough in size to be maintainable and sailable by a dedicated person of modest means, and they are certainly worthy of such love and obsession. This isn't Gannet, but is one of her sisters. [​IMG]
     
  4. kostisoutback
    Joined: Feb 2016
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    kostisoutback Junior Member

    Thank you both. PAR thanks for you reply. I didn't know that the pilot cutters where not that safe.
    Ok late me ask you guys this. Get a boat. For example a Garden design. It is already build. It is already a ketch. Assuming that it gets surveyed and it is ok structurally, is it possible to turn into a gaffer?

    Thank you again in advance. Then could i hire a designer to help or that would be not ok?
     
  5. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: OREGON

    rasorinc Senior Member

    http://www.glen-l.com/boat-plans-catalog-300-boats-you-can-build/

    Check out this site for sailboats. i SAY THIS BECAUSE THEy HAVE 27', 28', 30' BOATS and list out the material list and study plans, also see client build pics which will show you what is involved in construction of one. Offers some real good info that will be of assistance to you.
     
  6. kostisoutback
    Joined: Feb 2016
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    kostisoutback Junior Member

    Thanks mate! You guys are so nice here!!
     
  7. Sailcy
    Joined: Feb 2016
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    Sailcy Junior Member

    Each of us have a dream bigger our capabilites. Its still a dream particularry because one cant afford it FINANCIALLY, its that simple and is a matter of personal choise. Keep dreaming or convert it into reality. To achieve that imo one should do first to set up a realistic budget over certain period of time. Its not a time itself, its not a skills holding us out of realising our dreams its just lack of funds,,,impossible to build a boat out of plain air even if you've mastered the skills and have a million years of free time.
    I found myself to became very inventive if I desperately want something. Share the passion, find people who have similar dreams and solution will appear unexpectably.
     
  8. Tiny Turnip
    Joined: Mar 2008
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    In the UK, you can get skippered, catered sailing holidays in classic pilot cutters for under £100 per day... so for $1000/ month, that's 7 days sailing a month, lots of boats and locations to choose from, no headaches about repairs, insurance, mooring/marinas etc, expertise on hand... I know its not the same as your own boat; just sayin. Btw, I'm selling a 16' 2-4 berth gaffer if you're interested! :D
     
  9. kostisoutback
    Joined: Feb 2016
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    kostisoutback Junior Member

    Tiny I don't think I would be interested importing anything. But if the price is such that I just can't turn down maybe I could get and movie to Corfu for my holidays. Pictures?

    As for me, I think I found the answer
     
  10. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Pray tell, what is your answer?
    Inquiring minds and all that.....

    I'd just like to see what was the result from all the discussion.
     
  11. kostisoutback
    Joined: Feb 2016
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    kostisoutback Junior Member

    A CT 41. Then change it to gaffer
     
  12. kostisoutback
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    kostisoutback Junior Member

    Like the idea?
     
  13. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    I like trimarans.
    I don't like gaff rigs.
    But to each his own.

    Best of luck.
     
  14. kostisoutback
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    kostisoutback Junior Member

    Never got the concept or trimarans. If two hulls are good why add an other?
     

  15. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    To each his own.

    Others would say one is enough why do you need trainiing wheels.

    I don't understand why is is OK to go slow.

    Enjoy your boat.
     
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