Looking to identify Fiberform Model?

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by omurray05, Jul 3, 2016.

  1. omurray05
    Joined: Jul 2016
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    Location: Bend, Oregon

    omurray05 New Member

    I just purchased this boat a few days ago. It doesn't mention it anywhere on the title and i can't find this model on google images. its a 1973 Fiberform 19ft. inboard engine. Its driving me crazy! hopefully the pictures are good enough! i can get better ones if necessary! :confused:
     

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  2. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

  3. omurray05
    Joined: Jul 2016
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    Location: Bend, Oregon

    omurray05 New Member

    Thanks!!looks like this is indeed the closest!!
     
  4. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

  5. Bill Stevens
    Joined: Mar 2019
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    Location: Ca

    Bill Stevens Junior Member

    I’m having the same issue, I thought mine was a 71 fiberfoam but you pictures look identical to my
     
  6. Bill Stevens
    Joined: Mar 2019
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    Location: Ca

    Bill Stevens Junior Member

    I’m having the same issue, I thought mine was a 71 fiberfoam but your pictures look identical to my boat, Did you find out the make and model number, if you could share this info it would be much appreciated, I also have a 165 inline straight 6.
     
  7. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    What ever you need to know about the Mercruiser 165 inline six, just ask me. My 18 foot Sea Ray has one. I have had lots of experience with that engine. That's not to say anything bad about it. Mine was 46 years old before it died. They are a good, strong, reliable engine.
     
  8. Bill Stevens
    Joined: Mar 2019
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    Location: Ca

    Bill Stevens Junior Member

    I do have a question on the inline 6. I got this boat a few months ago, its been neglected and I heard it ran a few years back? Anyways, I’ve been taking my time cleaning it up, it had some condensation so I drained oil and flushed it with a gallon of diesel and drained. Removed the valve cover, cleaned the rockers up, replaced valve cover gasket and reinstalled valve cover. A few days ago I removed the spark plugs, which didn’t look bad and started spraying PB blaster in the cylinders, this was suggested by someone on this forum.
    My question: I want to turn the engine by hand a little at a time, do you have a suggestion on how to do this without having to remove the front motor mount?
     
  9. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    I can't remember exactly how I did that. It was 10 years ago, but I do recall turning it over slowly by hand. I took out all the spark plugs and put oil in the cylinders first like you did with PB blaster. (great stuff, didn't know about it until later) But I do remember that I couldn't find a way to just put a socket wrench on it. Looking at the photos I took, I think what I did was loosen two of the bolts on the bell housing on the front of the pulley, and used a bar between them to lever it. There are four bolts holding it on so loosening two wouldn't hurt anything. My only fear was it would screw up the threads, but then if it wouldn't turn at all, so what? The bolts can be replaced if they get gummed up. If it doesn't turn, nothing lost anyway. Of course first I tightened the belt so it wouldn't slip. It will, if the thing won't turn over. Try it.

    By the way, this is just a marinized GM 250. So many of the parts from the GM 250 work. But be careful. On mine one of the first things I noticed was the thermostat housing and the water pump were completely rusted out and totally clogged. A previous owner had used GM 250 parts. Anywhere you have raw water flowing they need to be marine parts. I replaced them. They had also installed a automotive style distributor. I'm surprised they didn't blow themselves up. I had a lot of problems getting it to run smoothly with the regular distributor so I got a Mallory marine electronic distributor from Summit Racing. It solved the problem, but do not use the coil they recommend. It never worked right. When I put the original coil back on it ran perfectly. There are two different carbs for these engines. Mine has the Rochester. It works ok but has a flat spot at about 2000 rpm. It may just be that individual carb. The other is a Holley. I haven't tried that. Both are readily available on the internet from several sources, but they are re-manufactured ones. Couldn't find a new one.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
  10. Bill Stevens
    Joined: Mar 2019
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    Location: Ca

    Bill Stevens Junior Member

    Great, thank you some much for taking the time to offer these tips. I will try turning the engine by hand using your suggestions this weekend and report back on how it goes, thanks again!
     
  11. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,170
    Likes: 156, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member


  12. Bill Stevens
    Joined: Mar 2019
    Posts: 5
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    Location: Ca

    Bill Stevens Junior Member

    Wow, lots of great information here that I can use and will refer to as I go. Thank you for sharing this.
     
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