Looking for the name of this "gearbox"

Discussion in 'Inboards' started by Arvy, May 28, 2012.

  1. Arvy
    Joined: Jun 2005
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    Arvy Senior Member

    Hello all,

    I just stumbled across a drawing (at the Bruce Roberts site, after reading on the Tom Thumb designs in another thread), and I saw a solution for the engine and the propulsion shaft that I could use on my own design. However I have no idea where I can get such a kind of "gearbox" or wathever it is.

    Here is the drawing, and I talk about the green engine and the propellorshaft.

    [​IMG]

    Thanks for the replies
     
  2. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    I have seen such quite regularly but not recently - maybe an old timer (nearer my vintage) can identify the setup - V-drive? the gearbox had the thrust bearing and allowed the shaft to be lower and nearer to horizontal in most arrangements...
     
  3. Arvy
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    Arvy Senior Member

    Yes, you are correct, it is a V-drive.

    Thanks!!!!
     
  4. CDK
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    CDK retired engineer

    It is fairly common in the USA and known as a V-drive.
    Because the Americans do not have faith in sophisticated small engines, you will find only gearboxes designed for big V-8 engines. If space is not at a premium you can of course use one in combination with a European engine as well.

    Search for Glenwood marine...
     
  5. masalai
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    masalai masalai

  6. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Clever way to hide stuffing box to a place where you can't neither see nor service it IMHO
     
  7. Arvy
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    Arvy Senior Member

    Well, I have been looking a bit more into it, and for a sailboat with only a 50HP engine (so a small engine) I think most of these boxes are a bit too much over the top.

    The ARGO ones might be interesting tho.

    But I also must partly agree with TeddyDiver, on one hand it would make the gearbox and the clutch etc easier to reach, but the other side of the engine would be really hard to reach.

    I was just curious about it, but when I think longer about it, I will just stay with a "normal gearbox".

    Thanks for all the replies.
     
  8. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    CDK retired engineer

    There is a ZF15-MIV rated at approx 50 HP. That may be of interest to you.
     
  9. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    The most common source of a leak is the stuffing box log. If you cant see it or even get to it what does that tell you.

    I would not have one ever ever, even the most accessable will still be under the engine.
     
  10. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    CDK retired engineer

    So the short version is: if you have a V-drive, do not use a stuffing box because you cannot see it leaking.
    Use a $4 lip seal (Simmer ring) instead, it will keep your bilge dry for several 1000 engine hours. If you fear that even that will eventually fail, use a stack of those with some silicone oil or grease in the chambers.
     

  11. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    The problem is more serious --the angle of the shaft pushes up the gearbox. This gives quite a long leverage . Most G box applications call for multiple mountings on V drives to keep the shaft in line. Not have a shaft that stays in line is impossible to keep water tight unless it is a lfexible type capable of handling the movement a little more than 4 dollars .
     
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