Looking for sharpie plans

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by easywake, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. yipster
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    yipster designer

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  2. Tanton
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Tanton Senior Member

    Sharpie. Box boat.

    Arguably based on Bolger's concept, the 40' box boat is different in adopting a couple of feet of more beam, a pointy bow, a junk rig with balestron, increased displacement.
    One set of plans has been sold.
     

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  3. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Greetings,

    Tanton,

    Upon closer observation, the Sea Eel is fine boat you designed. Years ago when I first looked at it, I thought just like Boatfan, that its just a cheap copy but its a unique interpretation and in many ways better than original. When will it be built and how much do plans cost?

    Criticisms: 1. AS39 is more ocean capable mostly because of the almost 5-1 beam-length (thats the unrecognized reason for its success) and 2. Sea Eels wide stern seem it would make hull to unbalanced, I think old time sharpies had it right with thier narrow sterns. 3. The boat is larger than original and you have a smaller rudder.

    Why did you go against Bolger orthodoxy without the upswept bow? I think it was to bring underwater volume forward because of the pointy bow-wide stern, but you should explain your reasons and how it would perform differently. Why are there two ladders/hatches? Why is ballast placed at sides when you have room in the middle under the sole?

    Friendly suggestion: I know you have many boat designs but your website should be more organized according to sizes/type categories, maybe include prices, pictures rather than just boat design file numbers.

    Add the plan drawing with your post.

    Peace.
     
  4. Manfred.pech
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    Manfred.pech Senior Member

  5. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    What kind of sharpie are you looking for? What kind of power , what is the intended usage,
    what is the needed displacement.? These questions need answering first . If the desire is for a flat bottomed design with vertical sides then, a power barge, or long boat may be closer to the mark.

    F
     
  6. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    Thanks for showing us your work.

    I dont think Bolger invented the box section sharpie, although he made the most of them.

    F
     
  7. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

  8. Tanton
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Tanton Senior Member

    Sharpie Sea Eel.

    easywake.
    In short reply.
    Beam is 4 to 1 beam-Length. Narrow nevertheless.
    Wide stern. As you noticed. The hull is balanced by the forward projection of the bow to use the longest waterline.
    Old sharpies have overhangs showing a narrower stern in Plan View.
    Rudder. I have adopted a swinging down extension to the rudder.
    Hatches. It is preferable to have a couple hatches for safety and ease of access.
    Ballast. With a flat across bottom, the ballast is as deep as it can be placed either way. I preferred to keep the middle clean for stowage.
    Web Site. I have not touched it in six years and it shows. Sorry. i agree with your suggestion. I do not discuss price, cost on this venue for obvious reason. Be glad to reply all questions by addressing ymt@tantonyachts.com
    PS: I have not heard from the buyer of the plans.
     

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  9. tom28571
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Here is a large New Haven power sharpie recently built. 49' LOA and 11'6" beam.
    http://boats.woodenboat.com

    The thing you have to watch for in such sharpies is poor stability from weight up high. OK for canals and inland rivers but not so much for coastal or large open lakes.
     
  10. goodwilltoall
    Joined: Jul 2010
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Greetings,

    Would say of all the sharpie designers, Ruell Parker is the best, slightly edging out Bolger.

    This is the closet I've seen to an authentic 46' sharpie, once you drift away from that, you get things like Flossie. Ruell also has the very similiar 45' San Juan. Past that you get into fatter boats - Terrapin, Presto, Batteua, Motor Sailors, and Exumas. Very difficult to design the narrow sharpie, if you need more room than the 46' offers and still want a sharpie, you need to go even longer.

    Also google "Thomas Colvin Sharpies", additional confirmation for sharpies needing lenghth for the desired volume.
     

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  11. easywake
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    easywake Junior Member

    Sorry about not being very attentive to your replies. Been preoccupied with some difficulties on the home front.
    Thank you all for your input.
    I have to say that I am most taken with the boat suggested by tom28571, Flossie.
    I can picture her with a step stern arrangement for easy boarding from the dink.
    I understand how the stability is affected by the higher cabin structure and I'm wondering if that could be countered with a ballasted box keel to replace the need for a centerboard.
    I love the longer waterlines for speed and economy, but also love the headroom of those cabins. Ultimate goal is to live aboard cruising the great loop for as many years as we are able, so the ability to cross the larger open water runs with confidence is important also. Those crossings are pretty limited but necessary. Frugality dictates that we will want to design in maximum tankage to accommodate longer stays on the hook considering our dock length. Lower horsepower requirements are a definite plus.
    As I said before, of all the different styles of boats that I have fallen for the power sharpie seems to fit all of my wants and needs pretty well.
    Am I crazy?
    Russ
     
  12. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Greeting,

    Here's Bolger's Illinios.
     

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  13. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Here is the Messing About In Boats (MAIB) article about Illinois.
     

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  14. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Buehler Pilgrim, 45' x 10' x 3.3'
     

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  15. goodwilltoall
    Joined: Jul 2010
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Article on Illinois is a good read. If you would be happy with an outboard ( and shallow draft) - Illinois is the way to go, just shorten it to 47', which is still within proper sharpie dimensions (with lighter scantlings you can lower the overall height which I think is to high).

    With inboard, Pilgrim's 6-8" wide stack keel would be better to build than a box keel. Pilgrim is a neat boat but a sharpie gives the same performance with much more living space. As a reference - AS55 Liveaboard Sharpie has a box keel which shows how a full length keel looks on a sharpie - would build it only if going with inboard engine and then stack keeled.

    Looking at Flossie, I would raise the sheer by at least one foot and deck over the walk around, thats ok for protected areas but dangerous offshore.

    Peace.
     
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