Looking for input on glassing inner transom skin

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by midcap, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. midcap
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 57
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: United States

    midcap Junior Member

    I cut out the inner skin and will re use it so I Can pour in an arjay transom. The question is I have some woven rover and wanted to use that instead of my 1708 biax to save material. I am not too worried about moisture intrusion at the seam due to the transom being all arjay. I just need the roven to hold the skin in place before the arjay sets. Any advice appreciated.

    Also, is it okay to not use wax in the resin and leave it that way in the bilge and under the deck areas? I plan on using 2 coats of white gel coat rolled on only on the bilge areas that you will be able to see from hatches with the last layer containing wax so it can surface cure.
     
  2. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    You could use many different laminates for the inside skin. . Tabbing the transom and it skin onto the hull is best done with several offset layers of 45 45 eglass
     
  3. midcap
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 57
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: United States

    midcap Junior Member

    that's how I am tabbing the stringers in on the hull. Since I am using Arjay for my transom that will bond to the skin from the back side so the tabbing won't be as important as if I were doing a plywood core transom. That's what I am assuming.
     
  4. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 3,900
    Likes: 196, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 971
    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    It might be even more important than if you were using plywood. Arjay (what is it?) might be strong and tough in some ways, but not others.

    It's also not known the type and use of the boat or how big a motor goes on the transom.

    When it comes to woven rover, it makes a difference strength wise depending on whether it's a long hair breed like a collie or a short hair like a dachshund.

    Resin eventually will cure so it isn't tacky anymore, it would be OK to leave it unwaxed in areas covered. But if you have to walk on it, you have to watch out you don't track it all over where you don't want it.
     
  5. midcap
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 57
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: United States

    midcap Junior Member

    thanks on the resin part.

    it's the big strand woven I have. This is the website to the arjay 611 I am going to pour for my transom.
    http://www.arjaytech.com/index.php/our-products/ceramic-pourable
    It will be 1.5" thick and have a 135 v6 optimax outboard on the transom. The engine should be approximately 400 pounds.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2013
  6. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Hmm... I have no experience with pourable transoms.

    Somehow you will need to ensure that there are no voids after the pour.

    Perhaps a soft hammer and some banging like when pouring cement .
     
  7. midcap
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 57
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: United States

    midcap Junior Member

    I was thinking about doing that. From what I read, it is a very low viscosity material and will seep out of pin holes. I'll have to make sure that I go over the big strand rover with my smaller strand roven to seal the corners all up.
     
  8. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 3,900
    Likes: 196, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 971
    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    Oh I think you should pay some serious attention to tieing the transom into the hull.

    Is there decks or knee braces or splash wells or anything to help strengthen it?

    Maybe post a photo?
     
  9. midcap
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 57
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: United States

    midcap Junior Member

    Yes, i'll have the transom tied into the hull bottom and the stringers along with the deck/inner cap. It should be rock solid and no problems.
    Here is a pic with the skin cut out so far. Still a lot of prep left.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 1,411
    Likes: 57, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 584
    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Personally, from the point that you're at, I'd say screw the pourable, brace the hull, yank the transom and build another transom from ply. Do it properly and it will last longer than you'll own the boat.

    The choice is yours though. Good luck with your project.
     
  11. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 3,900
    Likes: 196, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 971
    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    The way I've heard pourables done is you leave both skins and stick a chainsaw (rented is best) down in there to get all the wood out and then pour.
     
  12. midcap
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 57
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: United States

    midcap Junior Member

    I already have the pourable stuff. I would have went back with ply, but the v20's have a pretty big curve to the transom and I didn't want to have to deal with that. Plus, when I sell a completely wood free transom should be a selling point.
     
  13. midcap
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 57
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: United States

    midcap Junior Member

    That's what I am doing, with the exception that I removed the skin and now I am going to glass the skin back on then pour.
     
  14. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Posts: 2,338
    Likes: 260, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 506
    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    In the real world of cores you should have the same laminate on both sides of the core, this gives much more strength and durability. Skimping on one side reduces the strength considerably. But...in the boat building world this rule is frequently forgotten.

    You need to build the inside skin thick enough to not deform when you pour the material in, most people brace both sides with 2x4s to keep them straight.

    Don't count on it increasing the value of the boat, you can rarely get more money from a DIY repair on an old boat.
     

  15. midcap
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 57
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: United States

    midcap Junior Member

    that's what I was planning on doing. The inner skin is about as thick as the outer and I plan on tabbing with the big roven twice and then probably go over all that with the small roven.

    I was planning on using 2x4's to make sure I don't get any flex. I should be able to run a few across and brace it to the bulk head to hold it there.

    I don't think it will increase the value and much as give me a piece of mind and also the potential buyer the piece of mind down the road if I sell.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. yachtnetwork
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,028
  2. UNCIVILIZED
    Replies:
    22
    Views:
    8,740
  3. dougkenik
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    2,025
  4. Rsfiberglass
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    1,656
  5. khalid songoro
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    2,264
  6. Oarswoman1
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    4,170
  7. Speedboater
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    2,814
  8. simon99
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,124
  9. 79Rocket
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,368
  10. hyboats
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    3,597
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.