Looking for Info (55 Chris Craft Continental)

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by brockmt, Jul 25, 2011.

  1. brockmt
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    brockmt New Member

    I just recently inherited a 1955 Chris Craft Continental 22' from my uncle. The boat appears to be in relatively good condition but I am looking to learn more about the boat. I was able to find the engine manual online but that’s about it. Here is what I know about the boat.

    It has a straight 6 engine, model MBL
    Still has the original bottom (it has been caulked)
    It takes about 4 days to soak up but does become pretty water tight

    I would like to redo the bottom of the boat but am new to the world of wood boats. I have been reading about 5200 bottoms but would like to learn more. I am a pretty experienced wood worker but have never worked on a wood boat. If anyone has any information about this model and year boat it would be greatly appreciated or in anyone has any book recommendations or website recommendations where I could learn more about boat restoration.

    Thanks,
    Tim
     

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  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    5200 is an adhesive caulk that doesn't do too well on below the waterline wood. Polysulfide is the best material. It was formulated specifically for the application. However, when you say caulked, do you mean with cotton to lock in the seams or just gooped over for a quick fix?
     
  3. brockmt
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    brockmt New Member

    The seams of the bottom were caulked with goop for a quick fix. You can see what they did if you look at the picture of the bottom.
     
  4. Tahoerover
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    Tahoerover Junior Member

    go buy this book:
    [​IMG]
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Unless that boat has been kept in a cover area for several decades, it's unlikely you'll be able to save the bottom planks. The seams appear to have had some sort of goo in a tube pushed into them, which typically means the planks will be badly damaged as you attempt to clean the seams.

    Planking as a consumable item and wears out, just like an air filter on your car. After over a half a century, the planking is long over do for replacement. At the very least and this would be the rare exception, the garboards will need to be replaced and the bottom refastened. I suspect this isn't the case and all of the bottom planks need to be replaced, but you might get lucky.

    Having done a dozen or so of these, it's also very probable you have many other issues. Judging by the apparent width of the bottom seams, you have at least some fastener hole repairs ahead, if not wholesale frame restoration and replacement.

    Get the boat surveyed by someone very familiar with these old warped bottoms. They can tell you the real story and a possible plan of action to sort out her issues.

    I would also strongly recommend you ignore the recommendation of the Don Danenberg book.
     
  6. brockmt
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    brockmt New Member

    For the past twenty five years or so the boat has been garage kept and only taken out of once every couple of years to be either revarnished or put in the water for a few weeks.
     
  7. keysdisease
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    You might join this group, I'm sure there are several guru's there that are painfully aware of the particulars of olde chris's.

    http://www.chris-craft.org/index.php

    I would recommend restoration with only original materials. You have a true classic and the value will be significantly diminished by taking any path but the original.

    Good luck, Steve
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Actually Steve, this isn't true. Most will consider an epoxy bottom more valuable then a stock one. In some circles a 5200 bottom will be more valuable as well.

    Tim, it sounds like you've found a good example of the type, but again it needs to be professionally accessed. Have it surveyed by a person with considerable experience on the type. If you where close by, I could have a look. I'll be in the Delaware valley area next week, where in PA are you?
     
  9. keysdisease
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    Then I stand corrected. I can understand why an epoxy bottom would be better than a traditional bottom, no question. But I thought from a value / collector point of view that original / original would be more valuable like with antique cars.

    Steve

     
  10. brockmt
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    brockmt New Member

    I'm about a half an hour west of Philadelphia. Unfortunatley the boat is still in upstate New York and won't be down in my area until I find a trailer that fits the boat or build a trailer myself.
     
  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If Barret Jackson's auction is an example, the clones of 1970 hemi 'Cuda's are commanding nearly as much as the originals, in some cases more, depending on craftsmanship. This is the key, as in most things, value is based on the level of craftsmanship, so a well done original build up restoration, may not be as valuable as a very well done 5200 job.
     
  12. Tahoerover
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    Tahoerover Junior Member

  13. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Well of course you lose points at a concours show, judging restoration and original condition craft! What would be the point of judging it you didn't have a base line to compare to? In fact any modification from original, no matter how intelligent or innovative it might be, will cause a judge to ding you with deductions, at this type of show. They're judging on originality and presentation, not durability, practicability or resale value.
     
  14. Tahoerover
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    Tahoerover Junior Member

    You might be surprised at how much value a well judged boat is worth. BTDT
     

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  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Very few yacht do the concours shows or will have restorations to this level of analness. Most owners want their yachts to be easier to care for, less costly to maintain and more water tight. The value of a concours winner is only worth anything, to someone else (potential buyer) interested in maintaining the yacht in this condition. Again, most want to use their boats, not part it on a trailer and leave it in the barn until the next show. A concours show boat isn't a boat, it's a trophy, mounted in a case and pulled out to test it's shine against other, none used trophy boats occasionally. A very small percentage of owners actually tolerate this for their yachts.
     
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