Looking for architect to design a microskiff

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Grnch, May 9, 2021.

  1. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    This example does not exist and you know (or you should). Is my answer clear enough?.
     
  2. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    You are basically describing the Boston Whaler 13 Sport. I got one upside down outside if you want a pic tomorrow. Damn thing is all blistered up after I steam heated the transom dry. This winter I am going to hole the blisters and vac bag the section dry.
     
  3. Grnch
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    Grnch New Member

    [​IMG]
    Guys, the design I have in mind is just like the an H skiff is.

    By Class Society I mean it has to comply with any international legislation let that be CS, CE and ISO standards. Call it as you will. Here in Europe I need CE standards and msot importantly the boat has t obe designed by a comeptent naval architect because they are production boats and I have a series of tests, reviews conducted by authorities before I can start selling them. It looks like I have found a gentleman who is nice enought to work on this project with us now.

    Also to address ambitions of exporting them to the US or any other countries. We do that now, 95% of my boats are exported to resellers to 10 countries in Europe, we are fairly succesful at that and produce about 80-100 boats a year. The business has been running for 2 years now overall, and every year we double production and sales. If the microskiff is designed we will appear with them next year in the Miami boat show to look for potential resellers in the US and export them directly to that market.
     
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  4. comfisherman
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    comfisherman Senior Member

    Kinda a mini flats boat. That could be a hit at the Miami show.

    Life goal is to someday end up in a place calm and warm enough to utilize such a craft!
     
  5. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The regulations in the USA are less stringent than the EU. The USCG has a section in their website with the regulations for boatbuilders.
     
  6. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    In what sense?.
    Can it be deduced from what you say that complying with the EU standards would also meet the US standards?
    A more detailed explanation, albeit very succinct, would be invaluable to the OP.
     
  7. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    In general the are many fewer standards for recreational boats in the US than in the EU. For example there are no specific standards about construction, materials and scantlings. The only stability rules (for recreational vessels) are related to capacity and floatation requirements.
    Ike, who posts on this site, has an excellent website for anyone interested in building boats for sale in the US: New Boatbuilders Home Page | Everything Boat Building https://newboatbuilders.com/
    Unfortunately, the USCG site with a summary of the regulations for recreational boats is not currently available.
    The regulations can be found by finding the applicable reference on this page: Federal Regulations https://uscgboating.org/regulations/federal-regulations.php
    and then finding the rules using this page: Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (eCFR) https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/ECFR?page=browse
    Also anyone planning to sell boats in the US should consider joining ABYC: https://abycinc.org/
    ABYC is an industry group who have a set of voluntary standards. Any boat which meets ABYC standards will be USCG standards and Canadian requirements.
     
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  8. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    A major difference between the US and EU regulations for recreational boats is for the US market the builder (US built boats) or importer (non-US built boats) self certifies that the boat meets applicable regulations. Third party certification is not used. (The builder or importer can hire a third party to evaluate the boat for conformance with the applicable regulations, but it is the builder or importer who certifies the boat.) No registration of the certification is needed. The boat just needs to carry a plaque which says it meets the applicable regulations.
     
  9. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    I would say that this is practically the same as is done in the EU.

    Although the USCG does not have rules for scantling a ship, which occurs in almost all administrations in the world, that does not mean that they do not ask that the ship comply with some standard of scantling, in my opinion, as it is done with the rest of international regulations
     
  10. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    My understanding was that in the EU a notified body is needed to certify that boats being marketed complied with the EU requirements. Is that incorrect? Can a builder just certify that the boat meets EU requirements without any one else involved?
    TANSL, I'm talking about recreational vessels, not ships. It is not a matter of opinion, it is a matter of fact. Vessels used for recreation in the US which don't have to be "inspected" including do no carry passengers for hire or carry no more than six passengers for hire (or not more than twelve passengers if over 100 tonnes), and are smaller than super-yacht size (I don't know the exact size limt but it is very large) are not asked by the USCG to meet any scantling regulations.
     
  11. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    @DCockey , All right, but you don't have to be mad at me.
    In the EU, it is the manufacturer who self-certifies the boat that he has built. A delegated body of the administration must verify compliance with ISO standards but it is the builder who certifies its construction. I think it can be said, as I have said, that it is similar (not the same) to what is done in the USA.
    The other question, I am also talking about pleasure boats, what has made you think otherwise? I can't understand it, why mix the big boats here if the OP is talking about a 13 feet one. What happens is that I find it amazing that the USCG does not require any guarantee that the structure of the boat will be sufficient for the work that the boat (recreational boat, not the big boat or the small boat for commercial uses) must perform.
    And, although I am very heavy, I will insist on my question because it is of great interest: does it mean that a boat that complies with the CE mark has no problem being marketed in the USA? Thank you for your patience and keep your spirits up.
     
  12. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    So the difference is in the EU a delegated/notified body must verify compliance with ISO standards while in the US only the builder/importer needs to certify that the boat meets applicable regulations for "uninspected vessels". No one other than the builder/import needs to be involved. I have previously heard comments and complaints about the cost for a delegated/notified body to inspect and verify compliance for the EU.
    You talked about ships, which generally mean vessels much larger than the ones being discussed here.
    Understand. But that is how the system works in the US.
    Not neccessarily. There has been work to harmonize the rules but I think there are still differences. I don't know the details of the differences as I have not worked with the EU/ISO rules. As far as I know it is possible to design boats so that exactly the same boat can meet both EU and US rules.
     

  13. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

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