looking for a design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Godwinned, May 22, 2014.

  1. Godwinned
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: Canada

    Godwinned Junior Member

    Hi, I am new to this site. So Im not sure what to expect. but here goes.

    I am looking for a design that can meet these criteria.


    Im hoping maybe someone has or knows of a stock design that might fit these criteria?

    I also have a minor related question but will ask it at the end.


    I have a plans budget of about 1000.00 U.S. so it cannot exceed this.


    this is what is needed:

    a powerboat with low power requirements.

    1. Displacement or semi displacement hull in steel or preferably a rugged cored hull, or perhaps even a marine grade ply hull cored with frp.

    1. a.

    Does anyone know what the chances of rot being an issue if done in cored Meranti, if water migrated into the core(ply?)

    2. I would prefer displacement to be between 8500-15000 max.


    3. I prefer developable surfaces but if sheathed strip makes sense as an option, I am happy with that.

    4. ideally fantailed. but not a requisite.

    5. can handle cruising in moderate seas, coastally if necessary, but it would be subjected to these sea states only periodically and not on a regular basis.

    6. (optional)beachable( tunnel stern?)

    7. Inboard powered is a must!

    I would like to have a go at steam, but I understand steam takes up a lot of space. I am ok with this.

    But if absolutely necessary, I would settle for diesel.

    8. could be used to live aboard. My wife and I don't need much space, less than what would be considered usable to most.

    9. loa. of not more than 32 ft due to space limitations in our yard.

    I have looked at the internet for a few months but nothing comes to mind. I have looked at Glen-l, Atkin, and many others. (I love the stern tunnel designs but the only good one for my usage is 35 ft and too large to build in our backyard.)

    I have looked at Mr. Pars designs and there is one that catches my eye, called the "Floom". In fact it led me here, it has the room and the design I like but could it meet these criteria? can it be built in steel? or in a core?

    finally, my other question.

    I discovered a type of plywood replacement called "Coosa board".

    I can get the 20 lb density stuff for much less than Meranti 1088, but will this bend and form the same way plywood will? Is it suitable for a core and/or for hulls?

    Has anyone had experience with it? I have heard it is rot "resistant" does this mean that it can rot?
     
  2. Skyak
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    Location: United States

    Skyak Senior Member

    I haven't seen PAR around lately. Floom is nice and he has others like it. You should contact him directly.

    Your requirements sound bigger and heavier -offshore? If you are serious about steam I think that will dictate a lot about your design -hard to make it practical and safe.
     
  3. Godwinned
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: Canada

    Godwinned Junior Member

    Hello Skyak.

    I was thinking something more coastal. But sometimes coastal waters have no refuge for a ways, so its good to have a boat that could handle weather if needed.
    I am hoping it wont be a bigger, heavier offshore cruiser. For example
    glen-l's Union jack might work. the Displacement is around 17 000. its slightly larger than I had in mind. But it could work. It could even be steam capable. its very seaworthy. but a lot of work.

    Ill look for Pars site. Does he have plans site?
     
  4. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    These days you would be hard pressed to build anything for $1 US/lb displacement let alone $0.07-$0.12 per lb...so I think you are going to have to adjust some of your criteria. Even sheet steel at 24 gauge is around $600 per tonne and that is in 4x8 sheets. 8500 lbs is 4 tonnes +/- and $2400 before you even strike an arc or turn on a plasma cutter.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I assumed the 'plans budget' was the maximum he was prepared to pay for the actual plans.
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Coosaboard is high density PU foam with glass in it. I don't know whether it will take (slight) compound curvature like structural PVC foams will. I can't see anything in it that would rot, but whether water can wick through the glass, I wouldn't know. Meranti seems quite rot resistant from what I see.
     
  7. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    You may be right... I read that as plans and mentally translated it to planned. Skimmed it too fast I guess.
     
  8. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

  9. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Yeah, I thought he might have been a super-optimist for a second or two, as well ! The steam propulsion is probably more a romantic notion than a practical one.
     
  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yeah, I've been away for a while, commissioning a 1937 Elco.

    Floom is a near shore, coastal cruiser, though she's more houseboat than cruiser, she can make the great loop and other, relatively easy passages. Because of her windage, efficiency suffers a bit, but this would be typical of any craft of this configuration.

    She's outboard powered (single or twins), though an inboard arrangement could be done. I don't recommend it, as it eats up a lot of internal volume and increases draft considerably, not to mention the danger of having gear hanging below the yacht. Outboards and I/O's can be lifted clear and have dramatically better steering abilities underway too.

    Contact me by email if interested. My blog has received substantial improvements BTW.
     
  11. fredrosse
    Joined: Jan 2005
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    Location: Philadelphia PA

    fredrosse USACE Steam

    Steamer

    One might consider something traditional, but re-drawn with developable surfaces for easy building in sheet material, either steel or ply or? Some lines for old small seaworthy hulls, they could be scaled to suit your dimensions.

    Steam takes up more space, but a silent non-vibrating steam engine is a real advantage in my view. I have never been on an IC engined boat that didn't vibrate excessively, while the steam engines can virtually all be setup with no vibrations and no noise.

    Steam is way reliable too, no doubt about that.
     

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  12. fredrosse
    Joined: Jan 2005
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    Location: Philadelphia PA

    fredrosse USACE Steam

    Steamer

    And another. Look at thesteamboatingforum.net
     

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  13. Godwinned
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Godwinned Junior Member

    yes. correct
     
  14. Godwinned
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Godwinned Junior Member

    It is a romantic notion. I like steam. I like to tinker. steam is quiet. It is cheap to run on wood. but hassle to get wood aboard. the boilers are heavy, and they require a lot of maintenance and coding. but I still like it. fuel is on its way out, and will surely rise. why not go with something that could potentially be around for my grandchildren to use?

    diesel is fine too. I like that diesel is easily started. no waiting for the boiler to steam up. (no self respecting steam guy is going to use a water tube boiler since they are not "true" marine boilers) but diesel costs lots of money. New diesel engines are expensive. does anyone else here find it strange yanmar classes their engines 100 hp and under as "sailboat" engine?
     

  15. Godwinned
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: Canada

    Godwinned Junior Member

    Hi Par. yea I like that design, it looks like the old designs I see in the waterways here. It is a design that never goes out of style.
    But I can't compromise on my inboard wants. I can handle the negatives you mentioned. sounds like a good solid craft. Ill check your blog and send you an email. what would the power requirements be for the 9' beam version?(if in board?)
     
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