Looking for: a 10' s&g multi-chine sailing pram

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Seafarer24, Sep 29, 2009.

  1. Seafarer24
    Joined: May 2005
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    Seafarer24 Sunset Chaser

    I'm looking for a 10' sailing pram that is built stitch and glue with multiple chines. It should have a freestanding sprit or balanced lug rig.

    Something right between CLC's 8' Eastport Pram and 11.5' Passagemaker Dinghy.

    Basically, a S&G version of the larger Nutshell.

    Does anyone know of something that fits these requirements :confused:
     
  2. bistros

    bistros Previous Member

    You may want to look at Eric McNicholl's design. Check out http://microskiff.blogspot.com - although the described project is for kid's, Eric has done a larger version of the same design.

    His website etc. are listed on the blog.

    --
    Bill
     
  3. Seafarer24
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    Seafarer24 Sunset Chaser

    That boat has ONE chine, not multiple. Which is why I find it to look somewhat ugly.

    This is multichine:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I want something like this, but 10' long.
     
  4. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Perhaps you are more interested in aesthetics than utility. To each his own.

    Since your location is Tampa Bay, you can find the resident genius nearby. Contact Roger Allen at Manatee Maritime Museum in Cortez. Roger will know more about this sort of thing than anyone. Also, there are a bunch of boat nuts to be found at Lewis Boat Works, 39th Ave. East in Bradenton. This is a hobby type outfit where all sorts of folks gather to build small boats. They may very well have some useful input. The TSCA members around the museum will also know about the sort of boat that you fancy.
     
  5. Seafarer24
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    Seafarer24 Sunset Chaser

    Messabout,

    You have a great way of cutting to the quick of things. Yes, I am more concerned with aesthetics than maximum utility / performance. If I were strictly after performance I would build B&B Yachts Spindrift. In fact, I still might.

    However, I'm certain I can find a pretty boat that still performs to my satisfaction.

    Thanks for the tip about Roger Allen, that Mellonseed he built is beautiful. I'm actually planning to move my big boat to the village as soon as I go through the engine and get a new anchor.
     
  6. AnalogKid
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    AnalogKid Junior Member

  7. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Sounds like you might need to commission it.
     
  8. Seafarer24
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    Seafarer24 Sunset Chaser

    AnalogKid- Thanks for the link, I had seen the Skylark before but completely forgotten about it. He mentions plans for a strip-planked version as well, so maybe I could convince him to come up with something that looks more like a lapstrake boat.

    Lewisboats- You may be right about getting one commissioned. Either that, or bastardize another, similar design into what I want.
     
  9. John.E
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    John.E Junior Member

    I've just built a version of Pauls 'Redshank' and in these plans he offers an option for 'clinker/lapstrake' by simply adding 1cm or there about to the bottom of each strake (except the garboard) and then chamfer the face of the plank it lays over to suit. Maybe a simple solution without the cost of a one-off commision?
     
  10. Seafarer24
    Joined: May 2005
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    Seafarer24 Sunset Chaser

    I sent Paul Fisher an e-mail at the same time as my previous post. He as already responded to say "Sure, no problem. I can re-do it for clinker construction or add more chines for S&G".

    Excellent customer service! I can't wait to order the plans!
     
  11. uncleralph
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    uncleralph Junior Member

  12. Seafarer24
    Joined: May 2005
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    Seafarer24 Sunset Chaser

    uncleralph- Pointy bow = not a pram. Frames = not stitch-and-glue.
    It is 10' long and pretty though.
     
  13. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    For S&G you'll need accurate plank developments: a lot of designers don't provide those. So unless you plan to pass the lines thorugh a program like Free!Ship you will have to start with a design intended for S&G.
     
  14. AnalogKid
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    AnalogKid Junior Member

    Selway-Fisher plans

    I've ordered 3 sets of plans from Paul Fisher so far, 2 kayaks and a dinghy (11'6" Rhum). Two have been fully developed for true S&G construction, one of the kayaks has the bottom edge of each panel fully developed and the top edge is an approximation requiring a fairing baton and a block plane to get it just so. I think this is the case with his earlier plans, so it would be worth asking about such details on the plans for the boat you intend to build.

    I've corresponded directly with him a couple of times and got goo, straight advice. There's also a Yahoo group for builders of his designs which is becoming a little more active in the last few months, with plenty of pictures of completed boats of various designs.
     

  15. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    I meant no disrespect when I mentioned Aesthetics vs utility. I like elegant boats too.

    A fellow in my town is has almost finished a little ten footer from the drawing board of Ian Oughtred. It is pointy at one end, lap straked, (lots of em) and decidedly gorgeous. You might explore some of the little boats from that designer. His boats are not S&G types.

    I can put up a pretty stubborn argument against S&G builds if the boat is more involved than a flat bottomed skiff. I claim that the boat can be built faster and cleaner using conventional construction methods such as those described by Tom Hill and others. All that hole drilling and wiring and unwiring and panel layouts and wire hole filling are more time consuming than building a proper form with ribbands and all. The difference is that a considerable part of the build time is involved in making the forms. It doesn't look like a boat soon enough for some people to endure. Once the form is built the rest is easy sledding.
     
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