Long term survival boat ideas

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by mmutch, Nov 9, 2012.

  1. champ0815
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    champ0815 Senior Member

    Well, I think everyone has to agree that a survival boat can at maximum be used for staying on the ocean long enough to reach a habitable shore line. Otherwise it would ask for some kind of floating biosphere project (what happened to them?).
    For this kind of operation I would use maybe an abandoned cargo ship or oil platform, load it with a few tons of soil and hope to drift in the right direction - away from the zombies.
     
  2. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    There is a difference in a urban escape boat and a survival boat. Unless you have something in the marina a kayak in the apartment, folding boat or inflatable might be your best bet. I'd prefer a sail row of 18 -20 feet but if its in the driveway it still has to get to the water and portage might be the only option. Trying to escape by land through a place like LA with all the turf wars on foot is hard enough without a calamity!
     
  3. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    He is a Guy called Reid Stowe who actually did complete the voyage but under an incredible heap of invective from Sailing Anarchy posters. He sailed in a big schooner which he and his family had built. It was like a ferro cement boat --but with trowelled plastic putty in place of the cement.
    He took off from New York with a young girl called Soanya. Understandably she eventually got pregnant and Stowe had to offload her at one point without going ashore himself and she returned to New York. He continued on and apparantly completed the voyage, but I don't know the details.
     
  4. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    redboat, on 09 September 2011 - 04:59 AM, said:
    I guess Stowe is still bobbing around, people continue to give him enough stuff to get by and he manages to lure in another young thing.

    So it's off to Guyana? Away from the "yachties", lawyers and bill collectors.

    Still amazed he can sail around NY harbor without being impounded.



    Wednesday, 07 September 2011



    After a year of boat living in the protected waters of New York Harbor, Soanya and I are feeling the call of the wild wide open sea again. We think our three year old son Darshen is ready to go too. When a storm wind blows between the buildings that line the waterfront, Darshen stands in the wind with his arms stretched out to the sides and shouts over and over again, “I love the breeze!” Soanya’s family is from Guyana and we have been thinking of sailing there for many reasons. We want to sail to a faraway place where we won’t tourists or “yachties.” We will leave NY be leaving NY and the cold North Atlantic and enter warmer waters and trade winds. As we sail into warm tropical winds we will make our landfall on a jungle coast and begin our exploration of Guyana’s rivers.

    A friend of ours had to abandon his 90 ft. sailboat. As a result, he gave us all the gear like the anchor, chain, sails, rigging, turnbuckles, ropes and pulleys. This gift freed us up to imagine we could go to sea again. We have quite a few friends who have been telling us that they want to go with us when we go again. So we are already taking crew onboard and are interviewing others. Rachel has already moved on the schooner and more are coming.


    Of course we will have to work on the schooner as we go. Seamanship comes first. As we explore the outer reaches of nature where few people go. We will share our story live as we did on our previous “longest non-stop continuous sea voyage in history.”
     
  5. bregalad
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    bregalad Senior Member

  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Loved this bit

    "Stowe and Guillem undertook a second exercise in January 2001, a voyage to Trinidad in which the Anne encountered severe weather off Bermuda.[34] The ship knocked over on its side once (although local papers incorrectly reported three knockdowns) in high seas, but righted itself. Having injured her jaw in the mishap, it was the last significant voyage that Guillem undertook with Stowe.[33][34] Of her reluctance to return to sea, she said of him: "J'aime Reid, mais lui c'est un poisson et moi non." ("I love Reid, but he is a fish and I am not.")"
     
  7. masalai
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    masalai masalai

  8. champ0815
    Joined: Apr 2008
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    champ0815 Senior Member

    Well, maybe not the best position for a boat in terms of survival but at least it looks not severely damaged. Could be worse with a less solid ship.
    Nevertheless due to fuel requirements not my choice for the task.
    But as this incident shows very clearly: no matter how "good" your ship is, in the end decides seamanship (and therefore the skills of the involved people) about survival or not.
     

  9. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    Truely the point to consider...
     
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