Long Range Cruiser

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Bruce46, May 2, 2011.

  1. Bruce46
    Joined: Jul 2006
    Posts: 81
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 49
    Location: Stuart, Fla.

    Bruce46 Junior Member

    Thanks now we are talking. this is what I was looking for discussing the merits of both sides and what basic gear to make it work.
     
  2. Kiwifinn
    Joined: Oct 2008
    Posts: 82
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 92
    Location: Auckland NZ

    Kiwifinn Junior Member

    I've followed discussions on fuel efficient power boats here for a while and have not seen anyone comment on Paul Bieker's 40' Long Range Cruiser Design. Have a look on his website, I'd love to hear what people think about it. I like the light weight, small diesel, huge CP propeller...
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 1,865
    Likes: 88, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 1146
    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    Well I think she should be a min. of 40/60 motor/sail 30/70 even better as you are getting in the heavy crusing sailboat class. Actually most of them are actually motorsailers but their owners are too vain to admit it :). The point being if you're going to the expense of installing sailing capabilites why not make them capable of driving the vessel without the engine say in moderate wind conditions. When designing the sails and rigging I would base it upon a popular mass produced boat. That way parts/sails are not custom and there is more opportunity in the used item market. In todays world price of fuel do everything within reason to be independent of it. The cost will never decrease-- they jump it to a crazy high figure--get alot of flak --then reduce it by half of the increase-- and the public gives a sigh of relief and thanks them--It's called marketing---Geo.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Bruce46
    Joined: Jul 2006
    Posts: 81
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 49
    Location: Stuart, Fla.

    Bruce46 Junior Member

    Paul Bieker's 40' Long Range Cruiser Design appears similar to Tad
    Roberts passagemaker lites. They aren't as roomy as the Nordhavens and other trawler yachts, however, they can get there faster on less fuel so there is good reason to look at the passage maker lite type hull.
     
  5. Bruce46
    Joined: Jul 2006
    Posts: 81
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 49
    Location: Stuart, Fla.

    Bruce46 Junior Member

    I've been reading the thread "Questions On How Keel Design Affects Lying Ahull Or Heaving Too" and I'm going to reread Desirable and undesirable characteristics of off shore yachts and Seakeeping and Seakindliness by J. G. Kobel. i'd hate to be out on the deep blue and discover that my design thesis was badly flawed.
     
  6. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 1,865
    Likes: 88, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 1146
    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    Bruce I am pleased to say thanks to Darquiri i have gotten the answer to my last query on long keels, regarding cross sections. __Geo.
     
  7. BATAAN
    Joined: Apr 2010
    Posts: 1,614
    Likes: 98, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1151
    Location: USA

    BATAAN Senior Member

    BERTIE here has worked out well as a "motorSAILER". She's a sailboat first, moving in all conditions with good response, the very large Chinese main makes the boat go in light airs plus is controllable even at 1000 square feet, she's very seaworthy being based on SPRAY plus tested hard for many years, she does 6 knots light and clean but I figure 5 knots in most navigating under power with the 30 hp SABB and controllable pitch, offset 22" prop. The main reefed and hauled tight amidships helps greatly in motor sailing with the engine at ideal RPM and pitch when working hard to windward at sea, when really trying to get a couple hundred miles uphill and not take weeks to do it or use up all the available fuel. The sail and engine really help each other, giving relative wind and very much cutting down fuel use while still keeping to a schedule (sometimes).
    We've come up the difficult US west coast 4 times this way, half load on the motor and mainsail strapped hard in, tacking like a sailboat but very close to the wind.
     

    Attached Files:

    1 person likes this.
  8. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 1,865
    Likes: 88, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 1146
    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    Ah Bataan finally a nice photo of you vessel. She looks heavy displacement, your performance specs not bad either. Nice looking sea boat, there's two Spray style here in our bay, Bruce Roberts designs I think ---Geo.
     
  9. BATAAN
    Joined: Apr 2010
    Posts: 1,614
    Likes: 98, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1151
    Location: USA

    BATAAN Senior Member

    Putting the bowsprit in earlier this week.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. u4ea32
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Posts: 416
    Likes: 14, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 192
    Location: Los Angeles

    u4ea32 Senior Member

    10 miles per gallon at 10 knots (Bieker's 40) is pretty good. Nothing revolutionary, just sensible.
     
  11. Bruce46
    Joined: Jul 2006
    Posts: 81
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 49
    Location: Stuart, Fla.

    Bruce46 Junior Member

    Some times we forget that the older boats were made to do more with less, yes they were quite slender but still there was room enough to be comfortable. Having lived aboard an 42'ACF and getting caught out in hurricane force winds I can vouch for the fact that they were pretty good sea boats.
     
  12. Kiwifinn
    Joined: Oct 2008
    Posts: 82
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 92
    Location: Auckland NZ

    Kiwifinn Junior Member

    I believe that doing more with less is the way boats will be in the future, not just because of rising fuel costs but as new propulsion (read energy storage) technology becomes viable the first applications will be of low power. This applies especially to long range type boats. I thought Dave Gerr's article on fuel efficient powerboats in Woodenboat no. 206 was really good, pointing out that slender boats can be both stable and comfortable when correctly designed.
     
  13. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 4,519
    Likes: 109, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1009
    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    "I thought Dave Gerr's article on fuel efficient powerboats in Woodenboat no. 206 was really good, pointing out that slender boats can be both stable and comfortable when correctly designed."

    True enough , but dockside , since LONG and skinny is required , the long part is expensive at marina rates.

    The construction costs of a 35 ft bloat boat , or a 60 ft slender will depend more on the vessels weight than the LOA.

    When more folks learn the joys of a mooring ball, rather than a dock slip, efficient boats may be created.

    Here in the pri$y NE USA a mooring is about $100 a month a slip in a nice marina is about 10X that for a season.

    FF
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. u4ea32
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Posts: 416
    Likes: 14, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 192
    Location: Los Angeles

    u4ea32 Senior Member

    Bruce, what is a 42' ACF? What were its dimensions, who built it where and when, what did you like about it, etc.

    If you were you were to build one today, what would you carry forward, what would you change?

    Pictures?
     

  15. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,303
    Likes: 185, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2281
    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.