Locking Oar locks set up (row)

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Dirteater, Aug 21, 2011.

  1. Dirteater
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    I once rowed a boat with locked Oar locks.
    It made every stroke perfectly. Of course I was delighted at the overall
    performance of the oars. but I must confess I did not take the
    time to give them a good look-over in regards to the set up.

    I have a 13 1/2 foot dory with a 4 foot beam.
    I have a wonderful set of 8 foot oars that are nice and light.
    I hopeing someone can give me and idea of why those oars
    worked as well as they did?

    should the oars be "locked in at 90" degrees at half stride? (mid boat, in respect to the oar lock position of course, I believe my oar lock position is acceptable.

    DE
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I strongly dislike oars that can't be feathered. It makes the stroke into a circle which is much less efficient. Oars need a bit less than 90 degrees so they tend to sink as you pull. Each setup and person will find a different angle ideal.
     
  3. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    Hi Gonzo,
    thanks very much for getting back to me.
    Are you suggesting that "locking" oars might not be as efficient?
    Part of the problem I'm having is the oars jumping out of the
    "U" of the oar. So perhaps it may be a better idea to get an oar lock
    that just has the bar running over the top of the U to stop the oar from
    jumping out, and then perhaps using rope (or something) to keep them
    in place in respect to length and reach of the rower.

    I think I'm starting to understand what your saying,
    sounds like it could be a better way to go for sure. :cool:

    thanks Gonzo :)
     
  4. nordvindcrew
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    nordvindcrew Senior Member

    locked oars

    If you are thinking of an oar with a pin through the horns of the oarlock and through the oar, then, I've got a little imput. As a kid, my 12' boat had pinned oars and they ground the flesh right off my hands and made rowing a pure misery. Oars that rotate in the locks can be feathered ( great rowing into the wind) and you can try the dory stroke which is quite efficient. Just being able to rotate your wrists helps prevent fatigue and hand cramping. More and more rowers here in Southern New England are using collegiate style oars with a sleeve that has a flat on it to position the blade for the catch and stroke. For more imput, see the thread; Designing a fast rowing boat. We've been discussing these issues and others for a couple of years. To every rule, there is an exception. Guide boats use pinned oars and are un Godly fast as well as sea-worthy
     
  5. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    thanks nordvindcrew,
    thanks for the heads up! good to know.
    I guess I'm gonna have to play around a bit.
    (just wished it didn't cost money) but atleast
    I won't be buying the pin type set up. :D

    DE
     
  6. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Round, captured oarlocks that can't fall off the oar also keep the oar from jumping out. When setting in the sockets to the boat's gunwale, don't make them level with the tops parallel to the W/L, but let the aft in a little, giving a tilt of 2 or 3 degrees. This loads the lock down in the socket as the oar tries to drive the boat forward. Good leathers and the use of vaseline make for quiet, well behaved oars.
     
  7. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    Hi Bataan,
    always a pleaser to hear from you.
    I want to be sure I'm hearing your right. :confused:
    I'm not sure what you mean by "let them aft a little"
    and "parallel with the waterline"

    Being a dory I mounted my sockets inside the rub rail. (1/4" support).
    thus angle of the oars are slanted with the top of the beam (angle).
    which may be correct? ( or do the sockets need to be more upright?)

    Now...
    the round enclosed oar locks would be great, but there's a problem
    (please see pics)

    and even more so...
    I would sincerely appreciate your perspective on these oars!
    I by no means am an "oar officianato" *L* but these oars were a gift, and
    I truly think there great. but perhaps you could shed some light on where this design comes from

    again...
    my thanks
    DE
     

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  8. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Oars look home made roughly like Pete Culler pattern. Square inboard section helps balance a lot, but of course can't use round locks. These originally as workboat oars would use a thole.
    See book PETE CULLER'S BOATS for much info on oars and rowing. What I was saying about the locks is if you install them with the axis of the pin (there's a fork on top and a pin on bottom that goes in socket) tilted aft from vertical several degrees the angle is favorable to keep the oar in the lock. If it were tilted forward from vertical, the oar would jump out all the time.
    Here's a gig with locks that have a higher forward arm to keep the oar in, and a thole on a racing pulling boat.
     

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  9. nordvindcrew
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    nordvindcrew Senior Member

    oar locks

    I'd try shifting the locks to the outside edge of the gunnels. Set them so that the bottom of the lock is high enough above the gunnel so there's no interference between the gunnel and oar shaft. I find that they should be at a 90 degree angle to the water or to a straight edge across the beam of your boat when viewed from the bow. I also agree with Bataan that the lock should be tilted aft a bit to help keep your oars in the locks. also look at your rowing position. If you are too high in relation to the locks you tend to pop the oars out of the locks. If you want round locks, rework your oars to remove the square section and then drill out the grip and fill it with lead. Works wonders.
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Dories are rowed with double thole pins. That allows the oars to be pulled out quickly. If you learn to row feathearing properly, they will almost never come off the pins. I prefer a single thole pin with a strop.
     
  11. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    I'm with Gonzo on this.
    Cruising in backwaters in BC I saw lots of round sided dories rowed with single tholes and a grommet, and often facing forward and pushing while sitting on a 2x4 on the gunwales.
    I asked why and was told "Rocks".
    On movie boats for we had double tholes that were poorly designed and I replaced many, but they work great for rowing, just a single thole is better.
     

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  12. Dirteater
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    Dirteater Senior Member

    Hi Bataan/Gonzo,

    thanks very much for the photo's and input,
    that really helps a lot. (as usual)

    DE
     
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