Lock Crowther Kraken 25 Trimaran.

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Oct 18, 2010.

  1. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    A crusing boat potentially far from help would be the ideal application of the concept. IMO day sailors with people willing to be on the wire could probably use 100+% for increased performance. This is not to be critical of Crowther, he had his reasons, proven in his later designs.

    Thanks for the info.

    Marc
     
  2. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    I think the concept is going to be a bone of contention forever and I think it's a different situation between large daysailor cats and tri's a cat is quite rightable and is generally significantly less beamy I dont think they right C Class cats without outside assistance (prepared to be proven wrong there) watching the last little americas cup and those expensive wings getting smashed up when the boats capsized I couldnt help but think a lightly built submersible ama tri might be a better solution.
     
  3. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Corely,

    If I had the money I would be right there with them breaking boats to win. In that situation (not offshore), flying a hull would be the only way I would go.
    You are right, this comes down to what you want to do and how much you will risk/ spend to do it.

    No need for contention. But anything I build would fly the main hull, just the way I was raised.

    Different strokes.....

    Marc
     
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  4. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    I quite agree.
    The submersible hull was well tried and eventually abandoned.
    Even Lock Crowther gave it away after one of his Kraken 40s buried its outrigger 3 M and the bow section imploded, resulting in the Tri capsizing. :eek:
     
  5. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    ================
    Marc, Lock Crowther's designs have inspired me for my whole life. But I gotta tell you: your comments here flat out inspire me! In this whole multihulls forum you will find damn few people who thirst for the excitement of flying the main hull on a performance small tri(or any tri for that matter).
    Thanks for your enthusiasm!
     
  6. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Oldsailor,

    I am somewhat puzzled at the assumptions/ attitudes that show up in most of the threads, even more so on the woodenboat forums.

    At work there are several of us who take pride in being called "dinosaurs" due to attitudes from a previous approach.

    I'm glad to share the attitude with you.

    Marc
     
  7. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    On larger boats I'd definetly agree large % amas are the way to go, on small boats I'm not so sure my dad sailed the kraken 25 for about 5 years he only ever used hiking straps not the trapeze and they often sailed in winds up to 30 knots in all that time he never buried the float hull once. It's interesting to read Chris White's view on the subject with his discovery 20.

    If the crew weight is sufficient the boat small enough and the beam sufficient hmmmmm. Maybe you could augment the low displacement floats with lifting foils when the wind was strong enough to justify it.

    I'm sorry I'm just musing out loud really but weight is king on a small boat and keeping the weight down is the key to good performance large bulky high % amas on a small boat are relatively heavy and would compromise light air performance I suppose if you have a lot of sail area and you can manage it doesnt matter.
     
  8. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Corley,

    Did you ever read the description of the Gougeons early tri's? Extremely light weight, big enough floats to fly the main hull, had some success in the days before full wing sails.

    When I asked if there were plans to build the boat, they said that later sail developments would make the sloop rig non competitive. Actually I just wanted to sail something like it, not to take on the C-class guys, so I was not completely satisfied with the answer. In 1969 that 25' boat weighed 320# and carried 255 sq ft sail, less than the C-class cat Scimitar that they beat.

    Light weight is where its at as you say. Actually I think the Gougeons might have been concerned with putting that light of a boat in the hands of someone they didn't know. Just my guess - if so probably a sensible precaution for their reputation. The boat looks like it might have been designed with similar concepts as Splinter, a later Formula 40 boat that is now in Australia being restored.

    Marc
     
  9. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    The Gougeons have come up with some interesting and innovative boats I think the original Victor T was a square tri too very lightweight and built from tortured ply.

    Was Splinter a Formula 40? I thought it was 25' x 25' I know the Gougeons built Adrenalin which was a Formula 40 it was in New Zealand last I heard but could have moved again.
     
  10. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Caught me again, I was thinking of Adrenalin. Sorry about the NZ/ Australia confusion. I barely got to Australia one time and make the continuing mistake of combining them. Wasn't intended to be an insult to either.

    Another confusion about the Victor T design. The amas were called planing in the Robert Harris book "Racing and Crusing Trimarans", but the picture clearly shows a displacement style as does the information in their construction manual. Then they show the ama displacement as 420# verses the 320# boat with 2 men. Probably they could not have flown the main hull, if my engineering courses still say you would need 320 + ~300# (two young men) = 620# ama displacement at least.

    Marc

    Marc
     
  11. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Back to the Kraken 25.
    Plans are now available again.
    $50.00 including shipping and pay pal fees.
    PM me if interested. :D
     
  12. Trisailor
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    Trisailor Junior Member

    Kracken 25

    Hello Old Sailor, Would like Plans for Kracken 25 dont know how to pay you via my Paypal Account not yet very familiar with operating this Thread as yet Regards Trisailor
     
  13. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Hi Trisailor.
    I PM'd you but I am not sure if it went through. If you did not get it I will send it again. OS7. :eek:
     
  14. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Ed. If you click on my pseudynm and then click on :"Send a private message to oldsailor7" you can contact me directly.

    Cheers Paddy. :D
     

  15. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    just thought I'd share some photos of my build progress I've constructed the strongback mould frames and nearly finished battening the frames ready for the triple diagonal cold moulded planking. You can see the kraken 25 shape coming through. This is the main hull I'm rebuilding by the way
     

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