Liveaboard, who had the smallest for a year?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Wavewacker, Jun 12, 2016.

  1. Wavewacker
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Thought it might be interesting to see who suffered the most (LOL) living on their boat for at least a year on the smallest boat. I'm sure we're talking minimalist!

    What boat was it?

    Was the design modified? How did you prep the boat?

    Was it a dock queen or did you go out? :)
     
  2. bregalad
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    bregalad Senior Member

    I lived aboard my 18' 6" Cape Dory Typhoon for a year. I sailed (and rowed/paddled ...no engine) it from the factory in Tiverton, RI to Fl and the Bahamas.

    Underway I didn't consider it suffering at all; in anchorages the cockpit was the primary living space. It was less satisfactory in marinas, so I mostly avoided them. I sold it and bought a 27' Vega that I lived aboard for the following 10 years.
     
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  3. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Both are classics!

    Evidently the first poster is the winner of the smallest boat as a primary address.

    I read about some guy who was living in a canoe under a bridge and officials couldn't run him off since he was on a moored vessel. Had he pitched his tent on land under that bridge he would have been hauled off. Obviously a situation out of necessity where wit prevailed over the "establishment".

    Economics is not always the determining factor to select a small liveaboard, simplicity has many virtues, a smaller boat may provide more freedom than the responsibilities of a large yacht.

    I think I'm getting too old to attempt to change lifestyles on a small boat, I should have done it early on when "things" weren't so important to accumulate and hold. A year is a long time too. :)
     
  4. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    Two Canadian friends of mine cruised for three years in a 14' Peephen. It was the smallest yacht to be admitted into the CCA. The boat was lost in a storm off Panama, but they were ashore. I also knew a family of seven who lived on a 21' Rhodes. Not small people, and only two small children. The adult children had been born and raised on the boat. I bought a Cal 28 off a family of six, who had upgraded to a Morgan 34.
     
  5. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    That is incredible, 14 feet, a peephen!

    7 living in 21', that's just 3' for each one! Guess the 2 kids were at the bow LOL.

    And 6 on a 34 isn't really comforting either. I guess they take turns being on board somewhat.

    Makes my canoe seem like a yacht! :)
     
  6. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

  7. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Then, there is another book by Serge Testa, 500 days Around the world on a 12 foot yacht.

    Weren't some "Around in Ten" boats lost, were they all found or could someone still be bobbing out there for over a year living off fish?

    To me, liveaboard is more to a person's choice of living on a boat for intrinsic values, perhaps to live more frugal, not as a requirement for an adventure cruise to prove a point or set some record. Seems like the motivation is different, but granted, they must have been living on or in the boat. :)
     

  8. W9GFO
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    W9GFO Senior Member

    Wow, and I thought my 25 ft Folkboat was a small live aboard.
     
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