Lithium battery from electric cars for boat use

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by Artem Klochko, Nov 17, 2019.

  1. Artem Klochko
    Joined: Dec 2018
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 10, Points: 3
    Location: Ukraine, Dnipro river

    Artem Klochko Junior Member

    Hi everyone, let me start this thread with description how we adapted electric car lithium module for boat use.
    This is how it looks finished:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Internal structure (at moment of photo made is not connected everything):
    [​IMG]
    It consist one battery module from Chevrolet Bolt electric car, BMS and contactor, driven by BMS.
    Tech specs:
    • The total battery weight is approximately 39 kg.
    • Available energy for operation is 5.5 kWh of the total 6.5 kWh (limited by BMS settings)
    • The voltage of a fully charged battery is 41.5V, and fully discharged at which the BMS disconnects the load - 31V.
    • Battery dimensions - 540x480x125 mm
    • Cell Chemistry - LiNiMnCoO2
    I tested this battery this year with 65 Amps charge and discharge (2.3 kW at 36V) and monitored it heat under load. Maximum cell temperature under load was +3 celsus comparing to ambient temperature.
    This battery is used as electric drive battery at my small sailboat.
    [​IMG]
    Some more details for battery here.
     
  2. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
    Posts: 852
    Likes: 93, Points: 28
    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    NICE!
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    At 40V that looks like a dangerous setup. The voltage is enough to kill a person.
     
  4. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    42 volt electrical systems were seriously considered by the automotive industry about twenty years ago. The rationale I heard for 42 volts was that it was sufficiently below the voltage which could harm humans.
     
  5. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
    Posts: 852
    Likes: 93, Points: 28
    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    That's what the phone company did so many years ago with land lines.
     
  6. Artem Klochko
    Joined: Dec 2018
    Posts: 24
    Likes: 10, Points: 3
    Location: Ukraine, Dnipro river

    Artem Klochko Junior Member

    Electric powered outboards for boats - Torqeedo https://www.torqeedo.com/en/products/batteries
    Torqeedo sell boat batteries of 24V, 48V and 355V. 355V batteries have same chemistry as cells at battery I made. I used another 48V batteries (not torqeedo) at boat for two years and 36V battery, described at this thread for one year. A bad weather was sometimes. No problems yet. May be it is dangerous but not for me, at last for three years.

    P.S. considering this
    Electrical Safety: The Fatal Current https://www.asc.ohio-state.edu/physics/p616/safety/fatal_current.html
    the fatal current is 0.1 Amps.
    Is I am correct if according to Ohm's law:
    I = V/R
    current via human body will be I = 41 V / 1000 Ohms = 0.041 A
    where 1000 Ohms - resistance of wet skin.
    So, 0.041 A is lower than death current 0.1 A.

    Dry skin have resistanse 500.000 Ohms, then
    I = 41 V / 500 000 Ohms = ‭0.000082‬ A or 0.082 mA

    I considered only skin resistanse. We also have an internal resistanse which is not depends on wet/dry conditions:
    "internal resistance (less the skin resistance) is only 100 ohms, while from hand to foot is closer to 500 ohm"

    Consider lowest internal resistanse (100 Ohms) and wet skin resistanse 1000 Ohms:
    I = 41 V / 1100 Ohms = 0.037 A
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2019

  7. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,609
    Likes: 382, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

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