Lining hull to insulate and stop sweating!

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by wesley Sherman, Dec 1, 2020.

  1. wesley Sherman
    Joined: Jan 2020
    Posts: 68
    Likes: 9, Points: 8
    Location: New York

    wesley Sherman Junior Member

    I am restoring and modifying an Alberg 30 from a complete gut. I have all the main bulkheads in and deck stepped mast beam in and about to start the interior layout and build.

    So my question is this. Before I get started I am thinking about dealing with some insulation for possible sweating. What would be the best possible course of action since I am at a bare interior.

    I wondering about lining the interior hull with 1/4 or 1/2 " end grain balsa. Epoxy and 1 -2 layers of biaxial or 7 oz fiberglass. Would this be enough to stop sweat or help? or would this be a waste and too much additional weight? I ask because I have about 40 sheets of 24x44 end-grain balsa core material.

    comments of ideas would be of help.. of what worked for you or someone Real-life success ideas not theory preferred.

    Also is insulation needed above the water line or both above and below?. I am not looking to be in extended cold weather mostly warm. Do the cockpit lockers and aft lockers need to be lined as well or just the galley living space?
    I will be installing an Eberspacher diesel 2k heater.

    Thank you for your advice and info in advance

    Is it possible to use Lcynene closed-cell spray foam on the hull good bad idea?
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2020
  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Wesley, if you are planning on sailing mainly in the tropics (a very sensible idea!), then there is absolutely no need for adding such drastic additional insulation like what you are proposing - if you were sailing up to the Arctic then yes, that would help a lot.
    I think that your hull and cabin sides are single skin, but the deck and cabin top are cored? Just this coring will help a lot, re the effect of sun beating down on the deck and cabin.
    Is it really worth it to have an Eberspacher? You might only use it on your passage south to the tropics?

    Re how you have all the main bulkheads in now, could you maybe update one of your previous posts about this with some photos please?
     
  3. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    A trick from my live-abord days.

    Line the hull side of lockers with the clear vinyl carpet protectors. The points which are intended to prevent sliding against the hull. This gives the "sweat" a path to the bilge without saturating the clothes in the locker.
     
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  4. wesley Sherman
    Joined: Jan 2020
    Posts: 68
    Likes: 9, Points: 8
    Location: New York

    wesley Sherman Junior Member

    The diesel heater is for days and times I am out and about in the cooler months. But then who knows what the future holds. Because I am at this bare-bones moment in my boat I would like to plan for unexpected future needs when it is easy.
    I will take some pictures soon and post them on my progress.
     
  5. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    No to the balsa. Not much air and not much r value

    you can furring strip the walls and add polystyrene foam-you can buy high density ps foam that will no delam like typical low density foam and apply a light glass to the facing side. Glue the firring and foam to the walls and trim boards offer a mechanical hold and may work no glue. You may need to use epoxy to hold the furring boards on well and some creativity to hold them during curing. Paint the glass facing.
     

  6. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 1,018
    Likes: 215, Points: 63
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    If you have a vertical aspect to the firring strips and leave a gap at the lower end, then condensation will have a route to the bilge.
     
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