Lines and drawings

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by NHC, Feb 28, 2024.

  1. NHC
    Joined: Feb 2024
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    Location: Texas

    NHC New Member

    I am working on a project for kids and am introducing them to some basics of reference lines of a ship but preferably a sub. I am looking for a good explanation with a diagram of the center line, frame lines, and buttock lines. Thank you.
     
  2. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Welcome to the forums.
    Most modern submarines don't have traditional lines plans like you are thinking. They are bodies of revolution and everything else is an appendage.
    Additionally, a lot of submarine technology (which includes shapes) is covered by the International Treaty on Arms Reduction (ITAR) as almost all submarine technology is dual-use.

    Now, WWII subs is a different mater. Try here for Ship Information Booklet (SIB) and Training Aid Booklet (TAB) pictures.
    Submarine Photo Index https://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08212b.htm
    Researcher@Large - USS Roncador SS-301 Booklet of General Plans Drawings http://www.researcheratlarge.com/Ships/SS301/Plans/
     
  3. NHC
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    NHC New Member

    Thank you for the info. Will check it out. What about for ships? Looking for a good explanation with a diagram of the center line, frame lines, and buttock lines.
     
  4. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Try this website.

    How to Read a Ship Plan https://www.themodelshipwright.com/prototype-shipbuilding/how-to-read-a-ship-plan/

    Edit to add: Just make sure you understand the difference between stations (used on the lines plan to define the hull shape), sections (used to show internal structure), and frames (i.e. the actual physical structure that forms the transverse hull shape). So while a 400 ft long ship lines plan may have 10 stations to define the hull shape, there might be 200 or more actual frames detailed on the construction plans that need to be picked off the loft floor to make up the physical hull.

    Boats for Beginners - Navy Ships https://man.fas.org/dod-101/sys/ship/beginner.htm
    Nomenclature of Naval Vessels https://www.history.navy.mil/content/history/nhhc/research/library/online-reading-room/title-list-alphabetically/n/nomenclature-naval-vessels.html
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2024
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  5. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    If you want want some examples that are easy to understand and visualize, try Ruel Parker's Sharpie Handbook.
    For a bit more advanced examples, try 100 Boat Designs Reviewed. Both are widely available and very affordable as used books.
     
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  6. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor


  7. NHC
    Joined: Feb 2024
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    Location: Texas

    NHC New Member

    Thank you all for your help.
     
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