Liner Painting

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Asleep Helmsman, Apr 1, 2017.

  1. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    As Usual, Pearson did an uncommonly good job gluing this head liner in place. After 50 years it is still holding.

    However, it needs to be painted. I thought to use some kind of shellac based primer.

    What do y'all think?
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There's no good reason to justify the old shellac based primers any more. Scruff the crap out of the headliner and use a good quality primer. I prefer epoxy, because it always sticks, but most are pretty good now. The type of topcoat can affect the primer choice, what are you over coating this with?
     
  3. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    There are several reasons for using shellac.

    First off it is thousands of time less toxic. ten times easier to use and 100 times easier to clean up.

    I was thinking, to be honest, I may use some kind of water based paint.

    It is a million times less toxic, 20 times easier to apply, and 15 times easier to clean up.

    There is a lot of wood work down there and would really hate to get paint all over it. With Shellac and water based this will not be a problem.

    Plus I don't want to scruff it. I like the texture they used.
     
  4. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    What I'm asking is there any reason why I should not use shellac and Water based.

    It never get wet down below.
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Water based paints use the same (okay similar, just a different type of alcohol) vehicle as shellac based, just the resin base is different. If you eat the paint, you might have issue, but most attempt to avoid this. Toxicity concerns are way over rated, again, unless you're bathing in it. Some lab rats in California might develop issues when force fed doses of the stuff over several months, but . . .

    Alkyd and acrylic primers are suitable, as are epoxies, which for the most part are lower in VOC's than the alkyds and certainly the modified versions of these. There are also waterborne epoxy primers that are easy to clean as well. Lastly, you'll need to tooth the surface just to get the paint to stick. You don't have to remove the texture, just a good scratching.
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    What is the "headliner", some kind of texture coating ?
     
  7. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member


    I was referring to the application.
     
  8. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    In this boat, Pearson covered a portion of the interior superstructure with a cloth that was coated with some form of vinyl. It is actually very attractive it's just 50 years old.
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If it is vinyl, then it can be coated with acrylic paint, give it a good clean with sugar soap ( Trisodium Phosphate ?) solution first to get off accumulated grime.
     
  10. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A good degreaser is what I use on vinyl, "Purple Power" in fact. An upholstery buddy of mine prefers denatured alcohol. I'd also recommend one of the flexible vinyl paints, instead of an acrylic or alkyd. SEM products seem to work better then Rustoleum or Dupicolor. Let it dry for a few days before painting.
     
  11. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    There is a cleaner known as Awesome Cleaner you find it at the dollar store.

    It is like 409 on steroids.
     
  12. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I've never heard of Awesome Cleaner. I'm usually hesitant of new products without a good look at their MSDS, to see if any residual chemicals might remain, to contaminate a surface.
     
  13. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If we are talking about a confined and poorly ventilated space, any kind of solvent based cleaners could be getting the user a high like a glue-sniffer !
     
  14. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member


  15. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yeah, that looks a lot like the citrus blend I use regularly. It'll probably work fine, though lots of rinse water and let it dry. Vinyl fabrics seem to need more drying time that other materials.
     
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