lightest possible dingy

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Charlyipad, Sep 20, 2015.

  1. Charlyipad
    Joined: May 2014
    Posts: 217
    Likes: 7, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 57
    Location: St Simons is ga

    Charlyipad Senior Member

    My dingy is really slowing me down. It is Dave Gerr's Nester. She's light for her length, rows well with good reserve bouancy, and is stable with a load. She's too long though, to hoist up on the tramp of my 36' cat. I've been pulling her around on a short leash locally, and for local purposes she suits me quite well.

    But now I need a shorter dink that I can hoist up on deck- probably 9' long max, but shorter still would be better. she needs to be three person capacity, w/positive flotation, and as LIGHT as possible, within reason. (forget about carbon, etc) she needs to be affordable.

    I hate RIBS and don't have or plan to have davits.

    If you were going to build a dingy like the above How would you do it? What plan would you use? what materials and methods? Ply vs foam? If foam, what thicknesses? Infusion is out, though I know how to vacuum bag stuff.

    THanks!
     
  2. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 2,159
    Likes: 141, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1244
    Location: UK, USA and Canada

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Have you seen my Crayfish? Built with two and a half sheets 4 mm ply (although I did once build one in 2.5mm, it was a bit too light really)

    Takes 3 easily (I once had James Wharram and Hanneke with me in mine) very stable, sails rows and motors

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Charlyipad
    Joined: May 2014
    Posts: 217
    Likes: 7, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 57
    Location: St Simons is ga

    Charlyipad Senior Member

    Thanks Richard, that looks exactly right. I suppose if you are rowing and not motoring, and you need to get a couple of folks ashore you could seat them mid ships and push row from the transom?
     
  4. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 2,159
    Likes: 141, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1244
    Location: UK, USA and Canada

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Better to have one sitting on the foredeck and one aft. But my wife and I used to row together, both on the main thwart, takes practise to avoid aguements!

    The big advantage of the small light boats is that you can get them on board without removing the outboard (we had a 2.5hp 2 st) and so even though the boat only does 4-5 knots we beat most cruisers ashore allowing time for them to crane their RIB into the water and then attach a big heavy outboard

    its amazing how many cruisers think they need a 40-50hp outboard on their dinghy

    Another advantage is that plywood dinghies with small outboards are not very desirable if left on a beach

    Richard Woods
     
  5. Charlyipad
    Joined: May 2014
    Posts: 217
    Likes: 7, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 57
    Location: St Simons is ga

    Charlyipad Senior Member

    Good deal. I just ordered the plans. Shopping now for Okume...
     

  6. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 4,519
    Likes: 109, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1009
    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    The Grumman Aluminum dinks are light , under 9 ft and row or sail or power well.

    A search of craigs list might find one.

    These are by far the best for going ashore on a rocky beach.
     
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