Light Weather Headsail

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Mr.G, Nov 14, 2015.

  1. Mr.G
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: Tasmania

    Mr.G Junior Member

    Hi all,

    I have an old wooden 12 ton 38 ft cutter - good boat - I want to improve her weatherlyness.

    Her working sails are a large main, and a 100% jib/staysail.
    She has a bowsprit.

    I need a light weather sail to put on that bowsprit with the proviso that it be set flying.

    - either a yankee / top hat style that can be the first reef
    - or a code zero/light air genoa type flown with the staysail down

    I am leaning toward the second option...

    What do you think?
     
  2. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Don't know much about sails but i would like to see some pictures of boat if you can post them.
     
  3. Mr.G
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: Tasmania

    Mr.G Junior Member

    Here you go

    THis was taken in the DEntrecasteaux Channel with the old mast.

    The new mast is aa little taller.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Beautiful looking boat. I am hoping to sail down to tassie when i eventually finish my boat . I am on the gippsland lakes so a trip from lakes entrance via deal and flinders islands is my plan. Will you have your boat at the next wb festival.
     
  5. Mr.G
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: Tasmania

    Mr.G Junior Member

    Wbf

    Yes I most probably will apply to enter the 2017 WBF.

    If you like wind and waves you are coming to the right place.
     
  6. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    We have our share this side of the paddock too. I will fly down for the festival. As to your head sail there are some very knowledgeable people on here. You shouldn't have to wait to long for some advice.
     
  7. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    There seems to be a forward loop on the masthead fitting for a spinnaker halyard. The problem with a halyard that close to a furling sail, is that they often get wrapped as you furl the sail. Have you considered changing the furling system to one that allows for reefing? That would give you the option of a larger headsail.
     
  8. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    I think looking at your pic the everything looks short in the hoist... & now your mast is higher? I'd be putting money in the main to start with.
    If you're "set" on a flying sail set from the bowsprit a leathered ring with in-out control lines fitted to the bowsprit would be handy for the tack, fairly common on traditional boats.

    Jeff.
     

  9. Mr.G
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: Tasmania

    Mr.G Junior Member

    Thanks guys

    Yes she has a new taller mainsail now. The topmast in that picture is now the hounds, and the new topmast is another 9 ft further up.

    I have thought of putting a sliding tack arrangement - but I need to decide on either a yankee style of sail on the front or a light air screecher style first.

    Thanks waikikin.

    Oh yes; what was the furler's halyard at the topmast is now the flying headsail's halyard - there is now no spinaker attachment point - the halyard comes straight out of the masthead sheave.

    Gonzo - there is no furler anymore.
     
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