Light rowing boat as a tender for a 26' catamaran

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Aneblanc, May 21, 2018.

  1. Aneblanc
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Brittany

    Aneblanc Junior Member

    Hello,

    I am looking for a simple design to build a light plywood narrow rowing stitch-and-glue tender to carry on a 26' Wharram catamaran. The tender should be trailerable behind a bicycle for 1/2M. It should be about 9 to 10' in length. It could have short outriggers for rowing that can flip inboard. I would like to be able to carry it on my shoulder, so weight should not be much more than 15kg. A transommed boat is probably better for stability. A punt shape is good too. It should carry 2 people. I have built a few Bolger's Teals and I think that a shortened transommed version of the Teal could be what I am looking for, though the Teal is too wide to be light enough. I would gain rigidity with some rocker in the bottom, maybe a slight V and 2 side panels to create longitudinal stringers. Best would be a free design. Thank you for your input.
     
  2. Aneblanc
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Brittany

    Aneblanc Junior Member

    This one cork.pdf https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3HJtuO1-n5aR2xPeHkzYTUzUjg/view?usp=sharing is quite nice if I can make it a bit narrower to get it lighter. But how much narrower is the question.
    A 2-panels chined side would create stiffness.
    I like the single oarlock location. I don't know if it is really practical though.
    I am sure the person in the bow, either the rower in a 2 people configuration or the passenger in the 3 people configuration will get wet in the slightest of chop but I accept this limitation.
    I might get it lighter with a stitch and glue construction though I need some outer keel for dragging it on the sand. I can get rid of the chine logs with the stitch and glue chine.
     
  3. alan craig
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    alan craig Senior Member

  4. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: UK, USA and Canada

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Thank you Alan! You can see me carrying my Duo in the first rowing video and on my website. We use ours daily when cruising on our Skoota - we built it in 2 days 4 years ago. Add outriggers and you have a Tryst trimaran, make it nesting and it will fit in the back of a 6ft pickup truck - we took ours from the PNW to Oklahoma and onto Mexico a few winters ago

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs
    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     

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  5. Aneblanc
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Aneblanc Junior Member

    Thanks. Nice boat. It'll be probably too heavy.
     
  6. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Its built with 2 sheets 4mm ply, say 15kgs, cannot get much lighter than that and still have seats and built in buoyancy, never mind durability

    Richard Woods
     
  7. Aneblanc
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Brittany

    Aneblanc Junior Member

    I understand that. That's why I think the design is not the one I am looking for. A narrower boat will be lighter. I had built a Bolger Tortoise years ago as a tender. It would fulfill some of my requirements, light, 2 people, bike trailerable.
     
  8. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

  9. wayne nicol
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Queen Charlotte islands, B.C.

    wayne nicol Senior Member

  10. Aneblanc
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Brittany

    Aneblanc Junior Member

    Thanks for your input. My reflection is evolving.
    I am thinking that a minimal 6' or 7' punt with two 2½' detachable ends would be a good fit for my requirements of lightness, flexibility and available space.
    The middle section could be built in 4 or 5mm while the end sections could be built in 3mm to be light and completely enclosed for flotation and stowage.
    The ends could fit inside the middle section.
    The middle section could be used on its own with one person for short distances and easily carried up a beach on the shoulder.
    Assembled it could carry 2 more people seated on top of the end sections.
    Have you seen anything like that?
     

  11. wayne nicol
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Queen Charlotte islands, B.C.

    wayne nicol Senior Member

    sounds like an excellent idea
     
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