LED replacement bulbs for marine nav lights

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by sdowney717, Nov 24, 2011.

  1. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: Newport News VA

    sdowney717 Senior Member

    I am looking at some led bulbs that have a 20 watt equivalent incandescent rating. They look like this photo and have their LED in a perfect sideways pattern for sending light out. Some one on another forum said it was wrong, illegal, immoral, etc... to put an LED bulb in a light fixture intended for navigation. Said you MUST buy new LED nav light fixtures.
    Personally as long as the light can still put out at least as much as the original #90 incandescent bulb did, then I am perfectly happy with it.
    I went from OEM #90 weaker output, to 1142 (18 watts), and now going to LED (20 watts output).
     

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  2. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Gee...I can buy offset pin 20 watt equivalent led running light bulbs off the shelf. Been using then for years. Batsystem of Sweden is a popular brand. Perhaps the US is still behind the times with energy efficiency so you might have to order...or become the importer. Batsystem make some very nice gear. Particularly the anchor rope captive winch.

    http://www.batsystem.se/
     
  3. iceboater
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    iceboater Junior Member

    Manufacturer of led navigation lights explained to me the technology behind certified led navigation lights. The led fades over time and has lifetime of about 50.000 hours. The circuit in the light increases current to make up for fading led. After 50.000 hours the circuit will make the led flash as an indicator of that you need to replace the led. So basically the reason not to use them without control circuit, would be fading.

    More info: http://www.lopolight.com/index.html
     
  4. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    err emm 50,000 hours ? thats about 49,000 hrs longer than an incandescent running lightbulbs working life !!!

    I can break the filament of a red hot incandescent in one day of pounding to windward in a gale. I have never had an LED running light fail. sounds like nonsense to me. LEDs are so reliable that For a private vessel I would disregard this 50000 hr defect.

    It is possible that commercially registered vessels require bulbs that meet certain technical specs.
     
  5. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    The requirements and certifications are for the entire fixture with the factory specified bulb. This is because of the range, arc cutoffs and bleedover limits. That said here in the States I have never heard of a water cop checking what bulb is in a nav light. As long as there is light I cant imagine changing a bulb being an issue, although technically the light would be un certified

    Steve
     
  6. Chuck Losness
    Joined: Apr 2008
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    Chuck Losness Senior Member

    I bought my LED masthead light from LED Wholesalers in Burlingame CA. Advertised as a masthead light. Cost around $20. You can find them on Ebay and they also have a website. Have not switched my other nav lights to LED's but will probably do so in the future. You can also buy LED bulbs for nav lights at Defender Marine and West Marine. I looked at some fixtures at West Marine a while back and I couldn't tell any difference except for the bulb. Maybe I missed something.
     
  7. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    One issue with LEDs is replacement availability. I have no idea what an official led nav light looks like but would be careful when purchasing an LED nav light unit. I would say far better to fit conventional nav light fittings then use aftermarket LEDs. Also the cost...several hundred dollars...for OFFICIAL nav lights is just ridiculous. For small craft lights....yacht tenders ... Ive been using conventional lights and fitting 10 watt eq. LED bayonet bulbs. Indestructible and so low on power drain that I can run the lights off the 8hp outboard charge circuit . Those batsystem leds are 10 to 30volt and not particularly expensive.
     
  8. MechaNik
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    Location: Greece, Italy

    MechaNik Senior Member

    I have had Hella LED lights running on a boat with a very rough ride for 4 years. No failures but this year we noticed that the standby lights are much brighter than the primary's, especially the anchor light that see's the most use.
    No physical damage or missing LED's just dull from use?
     
  9. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Several years ago, I replaced my anchor light with a Dr LED brand replacement bulb. The Dr LED brand was approved by the USCG as a direct replacement for an anchor bulb and they had various LED bulbs made for various Aqua Signal, etc... models of light fixtures.

    There is nothing wrong with using LEDs. My LED was *much* more visible at a distance than the standard bulb that used to be in the fixture.

    Just look for USCG approval and you're all set, legally.

    EDIT: Apparently, the Dr LED is no longer approved! Went to the website to provide a link and found nothing about the approval. Not sure what to make of that.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2011
  10. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Looks like Dr LED has LED units CG approved for use in Aqua Signal 40 lights. http://doctorled.com/Dr_LED_PRESS_RELEASE_0612.pdf While mention is made that LED units are also available for Aqua Signal 25 lights nothing is said about CG approval for them.
     
  11. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    For thoses who like to read about beaurocratic standards like MilSpec toilet bowl seats....................................

    Very little on the actual bulb in the regs.



    Navigation Lamp Standard A-16.

    5.1 Collision Regulations, Annex I Standards

    5.1.1 Samples

    5.1.1.1 Samples submitted for testing shall be representative of the devices as regularly manufactured and marketed.

    5.1.2 Bulbs

    5.1.2.1 Lights shall be tested using the types of bulbs specified to be used by the manufacturer. They shall be selected for accuracy as to filament position and shall be operated at the specified lumen output.

    5.1.2.2 Alternately the lights may be tested using selected bulbs to place the filament at the lowest, the mean and the maximum vertical position and operated at design voltage.

    5.1.3 Photometric Testing

    5.1.3.1 The light shall be mounted on a two axis-goniometer so that the “horizontal” motion table is supported by the vertical motion supports, (see diagram 2).

    5.1.3.2 Alternatively the light may be mounted on a horizontal rotating plate and the sensor moved vertically to obtain vertical displacements. During this period the distance between the centre of the light filament and the sensor must be kept constant.

    5.1.3.3 Positional measurements shall be accurate to ±0.25 degrees.

    5.1.3.4 Sensor to filament distance and sensor aperture size (or sensor acceptance angle) shall be selected to ensure that the sensor acceptance angle at the light is smaller than the smallest increment of motion that will be used in determining critical measurements. Cut-off angles and measurements made in the vicinity of lens deformities and support obstructions are examples of such critical measurements.

    5.1.3.5 Sufficient readings shall be taken, particularly in the vicinity of lens deformities and support obstructions and when defining screen cut-offs, to adequately determine compliance.

    5.1.3.6 Polar diagram recorders shall not be used in determining satisfactory cut-offs unless the recorder sensitivity and zero base line can be adjusted such that angles can be read to an accuracy of ±0.25 degrees at a light level equivalent to 10 per cent of the minimum required candela.

    5.1.3.7 A suggested procedure would be to perform five (5) horizontal scans each covering the full arc of visibility at 0 degrees, ±5 degrees and ±7.5 degrees of elevation, and plotting on an x-y co-ordinate system. The areas in the vicinity of screen cut-offs could be plotted on an expanded scale as an aid in determining compliance.

    5.1.3.8 The sensor shall be corrected by suitable filters to that of the standard CIE observer and shall be calibrated against a NRCC laboratory or another recognized national laboratory traceable standard lamp.

    5.1.3.9 The response of the sensor and measuring amplifier shall be such that the rise time and decay time are approximately equal and sufficiently fast to reach 100 per cent of the incident light intensity when a step function is applied at a rate equal to the proposed sampling rate.

    5.1.4 Chromaticity Testing

    The colour of the light being emitted from the device shall be checked using one of the following methods.

    5.1.4.1 Visual Method

    The colour of the light from the device is compared visually with the colour of the light from a standard. The standard consists of a filter, the colour of which is determined spectra-chromatically, illuminated by a CIE source A. The chromaticity coordinates of the standard filters shall be as close as possible to the limits of the appropriate colour under test.

    5.1.4.2 Tristimulus Method

    In the method, photo-electric receivers, with filters to match the spectral responses of the CIE standard spectral tristimulus valves, are used to make colour measurements. The light being emitted may be collected in an intergrating sphere which in turn is used to illuminate the photo-electric receivers. If a two-beam telecolorimeter is used, portions of the light beam may be directed onto a pressed magnesium block from which the telecolorimeter will receive its input.

    5.1.4.3 Spectroradiometric or Spectrophotometric Method

    In these methods the actual spectral energy distribution is measured from which the chromaticity coordinates are computed. Any shift resulting from the sphere shall be corrected by filters, correction factor, or appropriate calibration. Sufficient portions of the beam shall be checked to obtain an overall colour measurement.

    5.1.4.4 Precautions
    1.The lamp shall be allowed to reach operating temperature before measurements are made.
    2.Measurements should be made in as many directions as required to define the characteristics of the light.
    3.Testing shall be done at such a distance, between the test instrument and the device, so that no further increase in distance will affect the measurement.
    4.The entire light emitting surface of the device must be visible from any point on the entrance window of the test instrument.

    5.1.5 Mechanical And Environmental Testing

    5.1.5.1 Mechanical Strength

    To ensure adequate mechanical strength for sea-going service and dimensional stability of the device, tests representative of the service to which the vessel will be subjected, shall be carried out.

    5.1.5.2 Temperature

    Lights shall be operated at ambient temperatures of 50 degrees C, 30 degrees C and -25 degrees C. Once temperature stabilization has been achieved at each of these three temperature stages, the lights shall be checked for distortion and damage. In addition, lights shall be cold soaked to -40 degrees C in a non-operating condition to check for permanent distortion or damage.

    5.1.5.3 Water Resistance

    Prior to water impingement testing, lamps shall be removed and replaced. The light shall be energized at rated voltage for a period of 1 hour a approximately 25±2 degrees C. A solid stream of water from a nozzle not less than 25.4 mm in diameter and under a pressure of 103.4 kPa, measured at the nozzle, is to be directed at the enclosure from a distance of 3.1 metres for a period of 5 minutes. The water temperature of the stream measured at the nozzle shall be 10 degrees C.

    On completion of the test, the outside of the light is to be dried with a cloth and the enclosure then opened and examined for any evidence of leakage and for cracked or broken lenses or globes due to the impingement of cold water on the heated assembly. There shall be no evidence of liquid leakage or evidence of thermal shock damage to lamps, lenses or seals.

    5.1.5.4 Salt Spray

    The light shall be subjected to a Salt Fog Corrosion Test in accordance with ASTM Standard B117-73, Method of Salt Spray (Fog) Testing, for 2 hours, using a 5 per cent salt solution. Subsequently, the light is to be placed in a high humidity chamber (relative humidity 95±5 per cent) at 35 degrees C for a 24 hour period. The light is then to be stored at normal ambient conditions (25 degrees C with a relative humidity of 50±5 per cent) for 3 days after which the light shall still be mechanically and electrically operative.

    5.1.5.5 Vibration

    The light is to be mounted to a rigid test fixture in a vertical position simulating a normal ship installation. The light is to be operable throughout the test.

    The light sample is to be subjected to a variable frequency test in each of three rectilinear orientation axes (horizontal, lateral, and vertical) for a period of 2 hours in each axial position (total 6 hours) at a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.51±0.03 mm. The vibration table shall be automatically cycled between 5 and 60 hertz (Hz) every 5 minutes. For this test, peak-to-peak amplitude is defined as the maximum displacement of sinusoidal motion (i.e. total table displacement).

    The light shall not fail to function during the test and there shall be no evidence of a failure of the enclosure, the mounting means, and electrical devices, or evidence of changes in spacing or orientation of components that could alter the arc of visibility. Gaskets or other means provided to ensure weathertight or watertight construction shall not be displaced or otherwise made ineffective. The failure of a lamp will not be cause for failure of the navigation light.
     
  12. LSI6220
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Location: Virginia Beach, VA

    LSI6220 New Member

    RE: Looking for 20W output LED replacement for 1142

    sdowney - I was looking for something else and saw your post. Did you ever find what you were looking for? I may have an LED bulb you could try to replace an 1142, or know where you could find an even brighter one. You can call me at 424-8636.
    Marty
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2012
  13. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: Newport News VA

    sdowney717 Senior Member

    I am using those LED bulbs for the anchor lights and some interior dome lights.
    I decided that since it is a power boat, the running lights can stay as they are.
    Idea being if you anchor out and want to leave on the anchor light all night, it wont drain your battery.
    For colored side lights, you likely need red or green LED bulbs because the white LED may not have all the color wavelengths needed and your nav light might be dim after it gets filtered threw the colored lens.
     
  14. BertKu
    Joined: May 2009
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    Location: South Africa Little Brak River

    BertKu Senior Member

    Hi sdowney.
    Let me confuse you.

    1 candela = 1 lumen = 1 feet candle. Your american standard
    A 100 watt lightbulb = approx 1750 lumens i.e. a 20 watt bulb = 350 lumens.
    there are 2 types of LED's, an organic OLED and a old fashioned LED.
    The latter one could last for 100.000 hours at the factory indicated current and should not fall below 80% of the brigthness after 100.000 hours.
    The brigthest white LED I have purchased in quantities were 20.000 mcd (millicandela) or better said 20 Lumens.
    Thus if you need 20 watt or 350 lumens, you either buy 18 white LED's or you count the LED's which sits in the items you may want to buy and calculate the equivalent in watts light output. (provided the white LED's are 20.000 mcd)
    ( by the way, the voltage drop per white LED is approx 4 Volt, thus for 12 Volt you need 3 LED's in series with a small resistor in series to prevent the current to go over the normal 20 milliampere maximum ratings. Your battery is normally 12,5 - 12,8 Volt charged , thus you need a (refer next thread) Ohm resistor.
    If you need 18 LED's for 20 watt, you need 6 x 20 mA = 120 milliAmpere in current and (refer next thread) Ohm resistors. A Red LED has an approx 1,8 Volt Voltage drop and a green LED has an approx 3 Volt.

    With the bulb OLED's it is a different story, the lifetime is substantial lower and the current is normally a constant current of 300 milliAmpere, the OLED will be able to give up to 100 watt in light power. If you prefer to increase the lifetime of the OLED, lower the constant current and you will get less light, but longer lifetime.

    Cost? A white 20.000 mcd LED I pay 36 dollar cents and for a 300mA warm white 60 watt I pay $ 2.75 each. thus 18 x 36 = $6.50. I prefer LED's as one can put Red LED's between de white, controlled by a switch for night sight.
    Bert
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2012

  15. BertKu
    Joined: May 2009
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    Location: South Africa Little Brak River

    BertKu Senior Member

    Some corrections

    I have put a number of LED';s in series to get a more accurate resistor value.

    Correction in Voltages. I have put a green 12 lumen, red 13 lumen, seagreen 12 lumen, blue approx 3 lumen and a white 20 lumen in series at 20 mA. The voltages are:
    green = 3.2 Volt. By putting 3 LED's in series for a 12 Volt system, you need 180 Ohm resistor
    red = 1.97 Volt. By putting 5 LED's in series for a 12 Volt system, you need 150 Ohm resistor
    sea green 3.3 Volt. By putting 3 LED's in series for a 12 Volt system, you need 150 Ohm resistor
    blue 3.18 Volt. By putting 3 LED's in series for a 12 Volt system, you need 150 Ohm resistor
    white 3.16 Volt. By putting 3 LED's in series for a 12 Volt system, you need 150 Ohm resistor
    Bert
     
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