Learning To Build A Model Boat.

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by graftonian, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. graftonian
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Grafton, IL

    graftonian Junior Member

    i have completed a design for a 36 x 8 foot boat, based loosely on Atkins River Belle. If ever built, stitch and glue would be the method of choice. I have many questions, and ask for assistance from those who have been down this road before. Primarily, I would like to investigate the efficiency of this hull type, and also look at interior arrangement options.

    Getting started
    Is 1:6 a suitable model/prototype ratio. Could the model be smaller?

    What would be your material of choice? I am thinking about 1/4 luan glued to 3/4 particle board for the forms.

    Being a tunnel stern style, i assume the model should be self powered for valid drag and trim results: True/False?

    Thanks in advance.
    Duane,
    Grafton, IL
    Where the Illinois meets the Mississippi
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    That is a huge model. You should scale down the planking to keep it in proportion. It will help in stability, center of gravity and other tests.
     
  3. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    A one sixth scale model is a sensible idea and the size allows you to simulate a lot of detail if you choose Six foot long models are a lot more forgiving than smaller ones, both at the workbench and in the water. Consult a drafting supply store to find a 2 inch to the foot architects scale. That is a worthwhile purchase that will make your model layout and building easier.

    Try to find some 4 or 6 millimeter okumee ply for the skin. Specify BS1088 quality. This is a big project so do not skimp on the materials that you use. If you use luan from one of the big box stores it will work, but finish will become problematic. If you do use cheap luan, then do a boil test before you buy much of it. Cut a few pieces that will fit into a large cook pot. Boil it for 30 minutes or so. Let it dry and then inspect thoroughly. If it shows any sign of delaminating then dont use it.

    You will need to use arithmetic of several kinds in order to maintain similitude. If you are not familiar with the stuff you need to know then start asking questions or reading appropriate books.
     
  4. graftonian
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Grafton, IL

    graftonian Junior Member

    Hello, and thanks for the reply.
    I am thinking of luan only for the disposable mold. I am not too far from aircraft spruce and specialty, and hope to find some quality materials there. Hopefully, a model store can provide hull fittings for shaft and rudder, but that is a long way off.
    I do have an engineering background, though very much out of date and unused. Plan to create patterns on a CAD program, at least the flat pieces. have had luck in the past gluing patterns to stock with rubber cement then cutting.
    Also, since offsets are in excel, I am experimenting with making patterns for developable surfaces, but again, that is for another day.

    Thanks, Duane
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Hot glue guns work great for models. Even if you use other type of glue after, it quickly holds parts together.
     
  6. graftonian
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Grafton, IL

    graftonian Junior Member

    Gonzo,
    Thanks for the tip, I was going to use modelers super glue to speed things up.
    Duane
     
  7. graftonian
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Grafton, IL

    graftonian Junior Member

    Gonzo,
    Thanks for the tip. My first inclination was to use super glue
    Duane
     
  8. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
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    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Cyanoacrylate(super) glue works good in a place where it won't get wet. You can use baking soda to form a fillet and then cyano it for an instant, very strong joint. Make sure to wear a respirator or at least a mask when working with cyano-the vapor is intensive. Don't get baking soda on your hand and then get cyano on it-it will burn. For quick assembly of wooden parts cyano is hard to beat. I've used it extensively on concept models and rc helicopters.
    Good luck!

    PS-a 6' model is a good size. Aircraft Spruce and Specialty is a great company-I've used them for years for carbon fabric, foam and other supplies.
     

  9. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    I think 3/4" partical board might be a bit thick, causing 'flat spots' where the skin curves over the forms.

    1/4" construction ply might work better, and you can angle the edges easier.
     
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