Layup schedule for Nidacore deck joists??

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by reelpleasure, May 4, 2014.

  1. reelpleasure
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 12
    Location: Massachusetts USA

    reelpleasure Junior Member

    I rebuilding a 25 foot lobster boat for recreational use. Over the fall and winter I removed the back deck and removed everything except from the original fir polyester encapsulated stringers.

    The original deck was plywood over pressure treated 2X6s over the fir joists that were nailed to the tops of the hull stringers.

    I'm rebuilding the deck support system with Nidacore joists and cross members supporting a Coosa deck. Nothing fancy but I'm reducing weight and don't want any or as little as possible wood in the boat.

    Today I laid up some 1.5" thick 1'X8' Nidacore stringers that will be Nida Bond and glassed to the top of the original hull stringers. These along with cross joists will support the deck. All will be glassed and screwed together.

    My question is a layup schedule. I have 1 layer of 1808 on each side of the joist using vinyl ester resin. Will one layer on each side of the Nidacore be plenty to support the downward weight of the deck. Each joist will be glassed with 12" and 6" strips of 1808 to the original stringer and hull.

    Will this layup schedule be plenty to support the deck?
     

    Attached Files:

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  2. FishStretcher
    Joined: Oct 2011
    Posts: 93
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    Location: On the Water

    FishStretcher Junior Member

    My gut reaction is to put another layer of 1808.

    If you have Dave Gerr's elements of boat strength, that might give guidance here. But knowing what Nidacore costs, and that you don't want to do this again, I'd add another layer. It will add some weight and modest cost, but I would do it.

    I was just doing divinycel sandwich core bulklheads for a 25 footer with vinylester , and although it isn't the same thing, the guidance was 22 oz per side minimum. I went with 34 oz, as I only had one real cloth to work with. Just as a point of reference. I also may want something to put a screw into or cut a hole in for cable or hose routing. So the extra is nice for that.
     
  3. reelpleasure
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 12
    Location: Massachusetts USA

    reelpleasure Junior Member

    6 joists all laminated up.

    Dark ones are VE resin with red MEK
    Light ones are polyester with clear MEK
     

    Attached Files:


  4. FishStretcher
    Joined: Oct 2011
    Posts: 93
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 33
    Location: On the Water

    FishStretcher Junior Member

    Your VE might be from Merton's. It just took a road trip to Maine? I don't know about Hamilton Marine, but I know he supplies another well known internet/mail order place with their "private label" resin.

    I think the label on mine is AOC "vipel" vinylester.


    I think version K023.

    http://www.brenntagspecialties.com/en/downloads/Products/Composites/AOC/Vinyl_Ester_Resins/K023_TDS.pdf

    Apparently it has some fire retardant properties? And it lists a rather high heat deflection temperature and a high allowable post-cure temp. Not bad for an engine room.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2014
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