Laying/sanding epoxy respirator

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by nadornati, Aug 15, 2013.

  1. nadornati
    Joined: Sep 2012
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    Location: NJ

    nadornati Junior Member

    Just curious, what types of masks/filters do you use when laying epoxy/sanding..

    Currently I don't use a respirator when laminating, although I'm thinking I should...

    When I sand/grind I have the 3m 6000 full face, and use the p100 dust filters..

    Thinking of switching over to these cartridges when laying/sanding - 3m 60926. They're organic and p100 dust filters. Anyone know the hours they can be used before being replaced? Thanks
     
  2. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    How much glass work are you doing ?
     
  3. nadornati
    Joined: Sep 2012
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    nadornati Junior Member

    Rebuilding a hull, from the ground up. I've layed about 3-4 gallons of epoxy so far. Never used a respirator when laying glass. Only use the dust filters when sanding/grinding to prep hull.

    Decently vented area. Boat is outside under a tarp/ structure I made, open at the now and stern to fresh air
     
  4. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    That 3m 6000 is a good mask. But like many people, I spend most of my work day in a 3m 9211 or equivilant particle mask. Pick up a few boxes of them.

    My rule is that if I can smell it I use the 6000 or equivilant , plus an organic filter. Its obnoxious to wear that big 6000 all day.

    Perhaps others have more suggestions.

    A well ventilated work space, first class dust evacuation tools, clean work practices and common sense are very important.

    Keep your shop vac outside the boat...run the hose up thru a thru
    hull fitting. Shop vacs stir up the air and make a mess in a confined space.

    Quality random Orbital sanders with dust evacuation are pretty clean. The big toxic mess comes from grinders. Fit an evacuation cowl on your grinder..several brands around.

    http://www.pwm-sales.co.uk/Details_options.asp?ProductID=134




    A dedicated epoxy mixing, paint mixing, station really helps to keep chemical spills and solvent out of the work area.

    Do not spray paint and be very cafeful using two part paints in confined spaces.

    A pair of garden type work gloves are very handy for general work. The gloves provide passive protection. Have a few pairs around and your hands stay clean.

    Obviuosly when youre working with goo' you need disposable rubber gloves.


    Ears get plugged up with junk..Whad Ya say ????

    Ear plugs are a good addition when the going gets heavy and help keep junk out of your ears. .

    Short sleeve work overalls are nice. They stay cleaner and you can protect your arms with disposable arm sleaves.
     
  5. pauloman
    Joined: Jun 2010
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    Location: New Hampshire

    pauloman Epoxy Vendor

    no voc in 99% of epoxies so not needed for application. Sanding is certainly another issue especially since epoxies take a week or more for full cure.

    now, skin contact with the mixed epoxy is another issue - and not a good one.

    Paul Oman - MS. MBA
    A.K.A. “Professor E. Poxy”
    www.epoxyfacts.com
    epoxies since 1994
    Member: NACE (National Assoc. of Corrosion Engineers) -- SSPC (Soc. of Protective Coatings)
     

  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Bingo, Paul has it. Freshly cured epoxy getting sanded is a chemical issue, as well as particulate and of course you don't want to eat it or smear it in your eyes or on your skin. Old work with epoxy (well cured for a few weeks) is just a particulate issue.
     
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