Last voyage for Costa Concordia cruise ship

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by daiquiri, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    Conspiracy syndrome Heiwa?
     
  2. Heiwa
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Not at all. I am just curious what kind of hold-back system 450 salvage workers are fitting 24/7 to avoid movements of the 8 000 tons heavy bow with big waves acting on it. :rolleyes:
     
  3. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Bananas

    Only a guess but I suspect they have it secured/moored to the grout with cables.
     
  4. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    And the answer is:

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Heiwa
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Sounds like a conspiracy! Are you one of those?
    There are no grout bags below the flipping bow and the grout bags are just cement bags that you cannot connect cables to. Any other idea? :rolleyes:
    I would really like to see a photo of this famous hold-back system of an 8 000 ton flipping bow.
    Aha, here it is ... an anchor.
    Could be used to moor a 20 ton boat in windy and wavy harbor down the road from my house. But 8 000 tons?

    So how was it done? Using the two CC anchors already dropped from the bow? Getting the windlass running under water getting the anchor chains back in the boxes? Why not? Everything is possible. And then adding some underwater mooring lines to somewhere. :p :D
     
  6. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    OK, Heiwa, YOU said you were the only NA in the world who understood what was happening to the CC. You said if it was not righted using your intelligence, it could not be righted. It WAS righted.

    So, how were all those 'stupid engineers' so much smarter than you?

    The same way I won your silly contest? I am still waiting for your 'reward check.'

    It must be difficult to claim you are smarter than the other billions of people on the planet, and to be proven wrong almost daily.

    Next you will start writing about little green men and global warming ....
     
  7. Heiwa
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Sorry, I have always just maintained that rolling a not very strong wreck like CC down a rocky slope you will damage the wreck in contact with the rocky slope. I never suggest anybody is a 'stupid engineer'. Why would I? I am a naval architect with a good reputation.

    And when did you win my Challenge about (1) structural strength and (2) space ship fuel consumption? You never entered any of the competitions. Pls try to abide to forum rules, try to be polite and keep to topic.
     
  8. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    When you pay up, instead of just pretending to challenge authority, then you have paid for the privilege of my being quiet about your silly claims.

    Until you pay me, I will point out your ludicrous statements attacking other Naval Architects, and your falsified claims about how the CC could not be righted.

    :)

    You should not throw down a gauntlet, and then try to back away .....

    PS, what engineering examination did you PASS? What authority holds your license?
     
  9. Heiwa
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Did you have a bad week, fight in office or with wife? Anyway. Topic is last voyage of CC where the Master at 15.5 knots tried to turn 44° or 58° starboard using the rudders, which would take max 4 minutes, but ended up damaging the port aft vertical side of the ship in contact with a rock after 6 minutes. An accident. Nobody died.
    It is quite easy to turn a ship using the rudders and here something went wrong. You cannot blame the Master for ship capsizing killing people later because the ship was not seaworthy - the responsibility of the ship-owner.

    Re my famous Challenges one of them is similar to the CC accident outside Isola del Giglio. It is a little off topic but quite funny:

    You are the helmsman of a 7 ton spaceship arriving at the Moon (outside Earth) at 1 500 m/s speed or 772 knots (just 50 times faster than CC) and you shall turn 90° and stop in 5 seconds or something like it. You only have a very powerful engine providing 5 ton thrust. How do you do it? Is it possible? Or will you crash? Like CC? If you can do it you win my Challenge.
     
  10. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    "Nobody died. "

    You are NOT FUNNY.

    People were KILLED by your 'friend.' It was not A GAME to be played by a pretend engineer to get more hits for a website. Your using these deaths as a marketing ploy is SICK AND TWISTED.

    You get visitors on your website from your conspiracy theories, why do you need these dead people?

    Is your website doing that badly?
     
  11. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    viking north VINLAND

    Don't know if this was a dream or not but i'm sure i saw an info session from the salvage company where they solved the problem of the overhanging flexing bow section by securing it within a steel cage. The cage being a negative shape of, and attached to the bow in two pieces (one either side of the stem) running aft and secured to the stable main hull. Is this bow section flexing a new problem that also includes the cage flexing with it ??

    A yacht is not defined by the vessel but by the care and love of her owner---
     
  12. Heiwa
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Nobody died on CC Friday 13 January 2012. Then about 3 900 persons aboard abandoned the damaged but floating ship using the lifeboats but about >300 persons were stranded on the ship mainly due to lack of trained crew to launch life rafts. The crew didn't know how to launch the life rafts as it had not been trained! The vessel lacked crew to launch the life rafts. The vessel was not seaworthy due to this defect.
    Early Saturday 14 January 2012 CC capsized and crashed onto the shore of Isola del Giglio, all hull compartments were down flooded and the ship sank sliding away from shore on the rocky sea floor. Then on Saturday 14 January 32 persons died due to the capsize.
    It is certain that the capsize was caused by progressive flooding through watertight doors. The watertight doors were not as per SOLAS. Due to these watertight doors the ship was not seaworthy.
    The poor Master was not really aware that his ship was not seaworthy, which is the responsibility of the ship-owner and maritime administration.
    Had CC been stopped in port, proper crew provided how to launch the life rafts and had all watertight doors been permanently closed and welded up, the ship would have been seaworthy and nobody would have died.
     
  13. Heiwa
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Before up righting CC was resting on its side and the bow didn't move. When CC was rotated up right away from shore on to some platforms, evidently the support of the wreck changed. The bow is now further away from shore in deeper water. Due up righting the starboard bilge structure was crushed and maybe flat bottom fractured and it is possible that the bow is not safely connected to the rest of the wreck.

    Salvors had fitted a 'blister' to the bow - a buoyancy tank, which evidently reduces the forces applied on the bow. However, we are told that after up righting the bow is moving apparently due to wave motions and that Salvors are fitting a hold-back system to avoid these movements.
    It would really be interesting to know how you do it! I doubt very much anchors are used or cables connected to some cement bags on the ground.
    It is not easy to repair cracks in a ship or wreck structure when the parts are moving, I can assure you. :rolleyes:
     
  14. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    viking north VINLAND

    Ok the Blister must have been what I am thinking about. ---
     

  15. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    It would be fasinating to watch how the salvage guys solve these problems.
     
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