Last voyage for Costa Concordia cruise ship

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by daiquiri, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. Yobarnacle
    Joined: Nov 2011
    Posts: 1,730
    Likes: 121, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 851
    Location: Mexico, Florida

    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Only this.Many large ship captains, super tankers and pleasure palaces like this one, the captain really has very little ship handling experience. They train and test only on simulators. In practice, they go from seabuoy to seabuoy. In harbor, a docking pilot takes over.
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 8,560
    Likes: 502, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Absolutely, this could easily been a Titanic scale catastrophe otherwise.
     
  3. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    You are absolutely right and I am absolutely wrong. Somehow, I got east/west bass-ackwards and made a complete fool of myself, again.

    lol

    Sorry folks.

    -Tom

    P.S. My whole line of east west logic is/was flawed I now see in most of my posts. I apologize especially to Michael and Daiquiri. Good thing I wasn't driving!!
     
  4. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I think the final maneuver was a good idea. The captain probably did not know the extent of the damage and chose between sinking Titanic style and partial submersion with a list.

    The last maneuver saved countless lives, imo.

    Just heard news from some Americans that were aboard. They jumped and swam to the island. The people who did this may not have survived in deep water.

    Also, see the picture a while back in this thread taken at night. The ship is still remarkably upright at night. It capsizes later, probably from water ingress. Had that happened in deep water, everyone may have drowned.

    I think he did the right thing at the end.
     
  5. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    If you want to see a fool, go see the thread about ganging outboards where i misread the yanmar power curve chart while doing a fancy explanation of ice vs electric. :)

    It happens to all of us.
     
  6. beachcraft
    Joined: Nov 2011
    Posts: 49
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 30
    Location: Marinette

    beachcraft Junior Member

    What happens to the ship now?
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 8,560
    Likes: 502, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I'm thinking the owners of similar such mega cruise ships world wide will be very worried about the effect on trade. An all round bad look that thing lying over on its side. And yes, getting it moved is a mammoth job.
     
  8. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 731
    Likes: 96, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1324
    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member


    Guessing that welding up patches and pump out will be straight forward enough- handy that the hole is on the rolled up side.
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 8,560
    Likes: 502, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Provided there isn't more damage underwater. Murphy's law would insist there is. :D
     
  10. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3,005
    Likes: 327, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Smit has began with the preparations for the removal of the thousands of tons of fuel oil on board and is investigating and negotiating the salvage of the wreck.

    Their first team started Saturday and are resting here in Giglio. - (translation)

    [​IMG]

    Cheers,
    Angel
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2012
  11. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3,005
    Likes: 327, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    We haven't seen the other side and bottom yet . . . ;)

    Cheers,
    Angel
     
  12. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 8,560
    Likes: 502, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I'd like to own a cafe in the village next to where it sank, though. The trade would be booming.
     
  13. charmc
    Joined: Jan 2007
    Posts: 2,391
    Likes: 78, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 840
    Location: FL, USA

    charmc Senior Member

    2007 was a bad year for ships in the Mediterranean. 3 months before Don Pedro, Sea Diamond, a Louis Hellenic cruise ship, sank in circumstances similar to Costa Concordia (Sea Diamond photos below). She hit a subsurface rock while maneuvering into port in a small island and sank within hours. In her case, a later survey of the site showed that the rock was located more than 100 m further from shore and was 15 m closer to the surface than was marked on area charts.

    In this case the practice of passing very close to shore at cruising speed seems to have been a major contributor. "I always got away with it before" will likely not be a credible defense.

    A terrible tragedy. Any loss of life is horrible, but the fact that nearly 5000 passengers and crew were evacuated safely speaks well of modern safety standards and excellent action by many, if not all, of the crew.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3,005
    Likes: 327, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1632
    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Info from Smit here . . . - (wacky translation of the jargon)

    ‘‘ a bit of oil leaked from the ship, but that volume has been limited till now ’’

    They are working with a local partner to remove the fuel from the ship.

    Cheers,
    Angel
     

  15. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
    Posts: 6,504
    Likes: 555, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 2488
    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    D

    Whilst i understand your sentiments, the 2 hours is very poor.

    All ships, under SOLAS regulation 21 section 1.4, must launch the full compliment within 30mins.

    So 2hours is very poor and hence questions shall be raised why...was it design, poor manning by the crew, or a combination of the two.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.