Large sharpie for the Adriatic

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Igor, Jul 1, 2022.

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  1. Rumars
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    Rumars Senior Member

    Yes it's funny what people will do and for what reasons. Go on youtube and type "Bristol Shipwrights", watch and then try to think of the reasons for doing it like that. Warning, cutting rolling bevels in strips is just a small part of his "lateral thinking".
     
  2. Igor
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    Igor Junior Member

    I keep searching the internet for more info on Oughtred Haiku but have not been able to find much.

    One that has been built (modified with stayed foremast) was featured in Watercraft issue no. 61 but that issue is sold out. There is something in no.38 too and I will soon receive that issue.

    There is one nice building blog of Haiku named Luely but the last blog entry was made in 2017, the guy did an exquisite job on the hull before he stopped posting.


    I think Haiku could be the most seaworthy and useable of all Egret variants, the one with useable cabin space too.
     
  3. tane
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    tane Senior Member

    I imagine a good cruising ground for these sharpies would be the shallow lagoons of the upper Adriatic, between Grado & Venice. This is where they would shine.
     
  4. Igor
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    Igor Junior Member

    You are on the right track, an interesting flat bottom skiff evolved in that area, in Croatia we call it "Batana" and it is the combination of flatiron skiff/sharpie and dory.

    *One interesting detail, it hasn't got a centreboard so the clr was moved aft, compensated with big rudder blade and mast position aft of centerline.
     

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    Last edited: Sep 10, 2022
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  5. tane
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    tane Senior Member

  6. Igor
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    Igor Junior Member

    Yes, the Sharpie 600 was already mentioned.
    It reminds me of Parker's Hampton flattie 24 a lot. Parker's boat has got a much more graceful sheer in my eyes.

    Chesapeake Flattie 7.20 https://www.boat24.com/en/sailboats/chesapeake-flattie-720/detail/506823/
     
  7. tane
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    tane Senior Member

    ...very personal, the aesthetics of a sheerline (for my taste the Flattie 7.20 has too much of a good thing, starts looking too "quaint")
    I cannot discern the construction of the chine on the sharpie 600; no chine log, no fillet&tape to be seen
     
  8. Igor
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    Igor Junior Member

    I know what you mean, I feel the same about the Indian motorcycles.
    This is very interesting boat altough i would not call it sharpie.
    IMG_20220928_125357.jpg
     
  9. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    I got to looking at a mid-upper 20' sharpie moored off Port Townsend the other day. Damn, those things have low freeboard.
    As good as they look on paper you need to study one in real life.
     
  10. Igor
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    Igor Junior Member

    Every time I walk along the marina I am trying to visualise a sharpie next to the boat of the same length.
    North Carolina 33 feet sharpie as drawn by Parker has got 13 inch freeboard at the lowest point of the sheer (up to the top of the coaming is about 20inch), I am having a hard time to grasp such proportions but it looks cool on paper indeed.

    Those were fishing/oyster tonging boats in Pamlico sound and as I have read on few accounts the sound can develop some pretty nasty sea states. Did those boats sailed like submarines or some magic beam/flare/flat bottomness and light weight ratio kept them dry is still a mystery to me.
     
  11. Igor
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    Igor Junior Member

    This is typical Croatian fishing boat from island Vis called "gajeta falkusa". 9 meter long on average, 3 or 4 long oars, big lateen sail and small jib.

    They were exstensively used for off shore fishing around the banks of distant Palagruza Island.
    What is interesting about "falkusa" is it's variable freeboard, the only such boat that i know of.

    Everything above the red stripes, from bow to stern was removed and left on the beach of island Palagruza while handling fishing nets. On the way home the sides were back to raise the freeboard and make catch filled boat safer in dificult off shore passage.
    335593836_f45048dd31_z.jpg
    falkusa.3.jpg
     
  12. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    It's always good to ask why indigenous boats did or had their features.
    Sometimes the reasons were hidebound tradition and the builders being highly secretive, which hinders progress.
    Usually not though.
     
  13. sharpii2
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    The biggest liability of low freeboard is the lee side rolling under in a strong wind. What happens then, assuming the boat is decked over, is the Center of Buoyancy (CB) starts moving inward at the same time the immersed deck acts to trip the boat.

    Freeboard is best measured in proportion to Beam. So a boat can be safe with quite low freeboard in proportion to its length, if it has a very narrow Beam.

    Some boats with extreme flair can also get by with low amidship freeboard, because there is a considerable amount of buoyancy contained in it.
     
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  14. tane
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    tane Senior Member

    when studying traditional/old designs one should not forget: in retrospect human life seems to have had a much different value then. Safety considerations as we know them today were largely unknown, boats (or any number of agricultural or industry procedures) we would think of as deathtraps were de rigeur in "olden" times, fishing boats to be lost "with all hands" was common.
    13" of freeboard, 33cm on a 30' boat...
     
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  15. Igor
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    Igor Junior Member

    What ratio of beam to freeboard is considered to be on the safer side? I do understand the problem of lee deck digging in when broadsided in beam seas.
    Here is 27ft New Haven sharpie, also Parker's. True 6:1 b/l ratio, it looks like a center hull of a trimaran.
    Sh-27sailing.jpg
     
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